Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun Plural form of positron.

Etymologies

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Examples

  • What is known for certain is that our galaxy-and others-are filled with tiny subatomic particles known as positrons, the antimatter counterpart of typical, everyday electrons.

    Space Business and Industry News at SpaceMart.com

  • The anti-matter, also known as positrons, shoots out of the target in a cone-shaped plasma

    British Blogs

  • The International Linear Collider (ILC) would be a machine up to 31 miles long, comprising two giant "guns" that would accelerate electrons and particles of antimatter called positrons to near-light speeds before smashing them together.

    Top stories from Times Online

  • The anti-matter, also known as positrons, shoots out of the target in a cone-shaped plasma

    Science Blog - Science news straight from the source

  • The anti-matter, also known as positrons, shoots out of the target in a cone-shaped plasma "jet."

    Scientific Blogging

  • The International Linear Collider (ILC) would be a machine up to 31 miles long, comprising two giant "guns" that would accelerate electrons and particles of antimatter called positrons to near-light speeds before smashing them together.

    Top Stories - Google News

  • The anti-matter, also known as positrons, shoots out of the target in a cone-shaped plasma

    Medlogs - Recent stories

  • The anti-matter, also known as positrons, shoots out of the target in a cone-shaped plasma "jet."

    SpaceRef Top Stories

  • The anti-matter, also known as positrons, shoots out of the target in a cone-shaped plasma 'jet.'

    Medlogs - Recent stories

  • Against this philosophical debating, hard-core physicists such as Richard Feynman who is represented here not just by a paper on the work for which he received the Nobel Prize but by his science-fiction-like suggestion that the particles known as positrons are electrons traveling backward in time, Sin-Itiro Tomonaga and Julian Schwinger ignored the philosophy and got on with solving the equations—after they had found the right ones to solve—coming up with a complete, unified description of everything in the universe except gravity.

    How Physics Got Weird

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