precession of the equinoxes love

precession of the equinoxes

Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A slow westward shift of the equinoxes along the plane of the ecliptic, resulting from precession of the earth's axis of rotation, and causing the equinoxes to occur earlier each sidereal year. The precession of the equinoxes occurs at a rate of 50.27 seconds of arc a year; a complete precession requires 25,800 years.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. The slow westward shift of the equinoxes along the plane of the ecliptic, resulting from precession of the earth's axis of rotation, and causing the equinoxes to occur earlier each year

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. the slow backward motion of the equinoctial points along the ecliptic, at the rate of 50.2″ annually, caused by the action of the sun, moon, and planets, upon the protuberant matter about the earth's equator, in connection with its diurnal rotation; -- so called because either equinox, owing to its westerly motion, comes to the meridian sooner each day than the point it would have occupied without the motion of precession, and thus precedes that point continually with reference to the time of transit and motion.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. a slow westward shift of the equinoxes along the plane of the ecliptic caused by precession of the Earth's axis of rotation

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • The Mayan shamans, for example, discovered the black hole at the center of the Milky Way, and their astronomers ascertained the precession of the equinoxes long before modern science did.

    The Sacred Promise

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