Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun The state or privilege of being named before others.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun The act of prenominating; privilege of being named first.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun The act of prenominating.
  • noun The privilege of being named first.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • In early June, Eisenhower reconsidered his rule of unbending neutrality in all prenomination races.

    Going Home to Glory

  • Mr. Buckley is there in San Francisco when, at a prenomination rally, thousands of college students declare opposition to their professors '"intensive indoctrination in state welfarism, anti-anti-Communism, moral libertinage, skepticism, anti-Americanism."

    Principled and Pilloried

  • This year the prenomination race offers a crowded field, with 65 nations submitting pics -- two fewer than last year's all-time-high of 67.

    Variety.com

  • During a prenomination interview, Barbara Walters, a woman not known for her own professional timidity, noted that Ferraro had missed weekends with her kids because of her political career and wondered why she’d kept her maiden name.

    Big Girls Don’t Cry

  • He reasoned that Eisenhower’s refusal to intervene against Goldwater had hardened into yet another of the many laws by which he lived his life: permanent and undeviating neutrality in all prenomination battles involving Republicans in order to preserve the effectiveness of his support in the general election.

    Going Home to Glory

  • During a prenomination interview, Barbara Walters, a woman not known for her own professional timidity, noted that Ferraro had missed weekends with her kids because of her political career and wondered why she’d kept her maiden name.

    Big Girls Don’t Cry

  • During a prenomination interview, Barbara Walters, a woman not known for her own professional timidity, noted that Ferraro had missed weekends with her kids because of her political career and wondered why she’d kept her maiden name.

    Big Girls Don’t Cry

  • During a prenomination interview, Barbara Walters, a woman not known for her own professional timidity, noted that Ferraro had missed weekends with her kids because of her political career and wondered why she’d kept her maiden name.

    Big Girls Don’t Cry

  • He is the one performer who can steal a scene from Ronald Reagan, and he did; as they viewed the Statue of Liberty, the visiting Communist played the self-confident superstar while Reagan ambled about like an amiable sidekick and Bush lapsed into the prenomination gawkiness that used to plague him whenever he stumbled across Reagan’s shadow.

    American Sketches

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