Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun The act of passing by; an omission.
  • noun In rhetoric, same as preterition, 3.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun The act of passing by or omitting; omission.
  • noun (Rhet.) See Preterition.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun omission (act of omitting to do something)
  • noun preterition

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun letting pass without notice

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Latin praetermissio. See pretermit.

Examples

  • This same carelessness or purposeful pretermission is evident in recent U.S. efforts to shepherd the negotiations process between the Taliban and the Afghan government, as American policymakers make decisions without weighing predictable blowback and without understanding the core tribal values of Afghan society.

    Michael Hughes: Saving Afghanistan Requires Smashing Dangerous Delusions

  • This same carelessness or purposeful pretermission is evident in recent U.S. efforts to shepherd the negotiations process between the Taliban and the Afghan government, as American policymakers make decisions without weighing predictable blowback and without understanding the core tribal values of Afghan society.

    Michael Hughes: Saving Afghanistan Requires Smashing Dangerous Delusions

  • This same carelessness or purposeful pretermission is evident in recent U.S. efforts to shepherd the negotiations process between the Taliban and the Afghan government, as American policymakers make decisions without weighing predictable blowback and without understanding the core tribal values of Afghan society.

    Michael Hughes: Saving Afghanistan Requires Smashing Dangerous Delusions

  • This same carelessness or purposeful pretermission is evident in recent U.S. efforts to shepherd the negotiations process between the Taliban and the Afghan government, as American policymakers make decisions without weighing predictable blowback and without understanding the core tribal values of Afghan society.

    Michael Hughes: Saving Afghanistan Requires Smashing Dangerous Delusions

  • The only objections they would occasionally make, would refer to the pretermission of some such thing as a tassel in the cap.

    Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, Volume 61, No. 380, June, 1847

  • This requires that all children, whether family heirs or emancipated, shall be specially disinherited, and declares that their pretermission shall have the effect of avoiding the will of their parent, and depriving the instituted heirs of the inheritance, no less than the pretermission of children who are family heirs or who have been emancipated, whether already born, or born after, though conceived before the making of the will.

    The Institutes of Justinian

  • It would seem right, that they should decide the claims of those who have acted under their administration, and their pretermission of any article, might amount to a disallowance of it in the opinion of the new government.

    Memoir, Correspondence, And Miscellanies, From The Papers Of Thomas Jefferson, Volume 2

  • Having thus briefly considered the original and office of a critic, as the word is understood in its most noble and universal acceptation, I proceed to refute the objections of those who argue from the silence and pretermission of authors, by which they pretend to prove that the very art of criticism, as now exercised, and by me explained, is wholly modern, and consequently that the critics of

    A Tale of a Tub

  • Any disorder of mine, any pretermission of theirs, exalts the disease, accelerates the rages of it; no diligence accelerates the concoction, the maturity of the disease; they must stay till the season of the sickness come; and till it be ripened of itself, and then they may put to their hand to gather it before it fall off, but they cannot hasten the ripening.

    Devotions Upon Emergent Occasions Together with Death's Duel

  • 6 If a soldier engaged on actual service makes a testament without specially disinheriting his children, whether born before or after the making of the will, but simply passing over them in silence, though he knows that he has children, it is provided by imperial constitutions that his silent pretermission of them shall be equivalent to special disinherison.

    The Institutes of Justinian

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