Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun Nautical, an English term referring to the propulsion of a punt in shallow water by means of a long pole thrust against the bottom. In America it is called punting, or poling.
  • noun The act of piercing with a sharp point; a stinging or tingling sensation.
  • noun Specifically, in farriery: The act of driving a nail into a horse's foot with the result of causing lameness.
  • noun The making of an incision at the root of a horse's tail to cause him to carry it higher. See nick, transitive verb
  • noun Musical notation.
  • noun The prick or mark left by the foot of an animal, as a hare or deer; also, the act of tracking an animal by such marks.
  • noun The condition of becoming sour, as wine.
  • noun plural The slips of evergreens with which the churches are decorated from Christmas eve to the eve of Candlemas day. Halliwell.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun The act of piercing or puncturing with a sharp point.
  • noun The driving of a nail into a horse's foot so as to produce lameness.
  • noun Same as Nicking.
  • noun A sensation of being pricked.
  • noun obsolete The mark or trace left by a hare's foot; a prick; also, the act of tracing a hare by its footmarks.
  • noun obsolete Dressing one's self for show; prinking.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • verb Present participle of prick.
  • noun The act of piercing or puncturing with a sharp point.
  • noun The driving of a nail into a horse's foot so as to produce lameness.
  • noun mining A nicking.
  • noun The mark or trace left by a hare's foot; a prick.
  • noun The act of tracing a hare by its footmarks.
  • noun obsolete Dressing oneself for show; prinking.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun the act of puncturing with a small point

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • I take great pleasure in pricking each berry with a needle in several places then dropping them into a bottle with sugar and gin, but others like to freeze the sloes in a plastic bag then bash them hard with a hammer or rolling pin.

    Nigel Slater's classic sloe gin recipe

  • As the Roman Virginius stood with his sword pricking the flesh over the heart of his beloved daughter, so do I stand ready to destroy my offspring rather than suffer its dishonor at the hands of any Appius Claudius.

    The Lever A Novel

  • Africa, the fashion is merely to raise the epidermis by a slight pricking, which is described as affording rather a pleasurable excitement.

    John Rutherford, the White Chief

  • Harris and Snelling were placed under keepers, who amused themselves by tormenting their unhappy prisoners in various ways; such as pricking them with their knives, cutting off small pieces of their ears and fingers, and pulling out clumps of their hair.

    The Knickerbocker, or New-York Monthly Magazine, February 1844 Volume 23, Number 2

  • He watched the tramp hobbling painfully into the distance, and in his pale blue eyes came that pricking which is of tears.

    A Sheaf of Corn

  • All about us billowed a profusion of wild beauty; and though for a long time there was nothing alive in sight except a flock of bright pink sheep, my stage-managing fancy called up knights of the round table, "pricking" o'er the downs on their panoplied steeds to the rescue of fair, distressed damsels.

    Set in Silver

  • Charles Payne, or Goddard, their opinion of "pricking" a fox.

    Border and Bastille

  • The ancient practice of "pricking" a name on a piece of parchment presented to Her Majesty at a meeting of the Privy Council is how she gives her assent to that individual becoming a High Sheriff.

    Telegraph.co.uk: news, business, sport, the Daily Telegraph newspaper, Sunday Telegraph

  • The ancient practice of "pricking" a name on a piece of parchment presented to Her Majesty at a meeting of the Privy Council is how she gives her assent to that individual becoming a High Sheriff.

    Latest news, breaking news, current news, UK news, world news, celebrity news, politics news

  • The ancient practice of "pricking" a name on a piece of parchment presented to Her Majesty at a meeting of the Privy Council is how she gives her assent to that individual becoming a High Sheriff.

    Telegraph.co.uk: news, business, sport, the Daily Telegraph newspaper, Sunday Telegraph

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