Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun Same as praying-desk.
  • noun In entomology, a praying-mantis.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun A kneeling desk for prayers.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun A kneeling desk for prayers.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun low bench for kneeling on

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

French, literally "pray God".

Examples

  • The Corpus Christi procession, Pope Alexander at centre, vested in a cope, kneeling on a priedieu under a baldachino, adoring a monstrance which he is carrying; the whole is being carried upon the shoulders of Palafranieri.

    A Papal Ceremony

  • A handsome four-poster bed took up most of the room, a priedieu in the corner, a shelf with a small collection of books, a lute.

    The Virgin's Lover

  • Johnny, at the moment, was kneeling on a marble priedieu saying a prayer to Saint Anthony.

    The Shadow Box

  • A handsome four-poster bed took up most of the room, a priedieu in the corner, a shelf with a small collection of books, a lute.

    The Virgin's Lover

  • A groan and a stirring from the other room sent Mary quickly back to the priedieu.

    Mary Queen Of Scotland And The Isles

  • The next room revealed a bed of royal dimensions, hung with blue velvet embroidered valances, topped with a tasseled canopy, and even a priedieu before a crucifix.

    Mary Queen Of Scotland And The Isles

  • On the wall was an ivory crucifix and beneath it, a priedieu covered in velvet.

    Mary Queen Of Scotland And The Isles

  • Slowly she stood up and made her way over to the crucifix hanging over the priedieu, flanked by two candle sconces.

    Mary Queen Of Scotland And The Isles

  • Darnley fell to his knees on the priedieu and looked longingly at the crucifix.

    Mary Queen Of Scotland And The Isles

  • The continual companionship of death, where the spectre seemed as real as the hunched figure of Madame Rallay or the veiled face of Mary Seton, kneeling on the priedieu, was intensely disturbing.

    Mary Queen Of Scotland And The Isles

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