Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun Plural form of prior.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Luca Pitti, in return for the services he had performed for the republic, as made a knight, and to be no less grateful than those who had conferred the dignity upon him, he ordered that the priors, who had hitherto been called priors of the trades, should also have a name to which they had no kind of claim, and therefore called them priors of liberty.

    History of Florence and of the Affairs of Italy

  • Long-time employees got to call priors, or alumni who have given most often in the past and would likely be happy to donate again.

    The Michigan Daily

  • a knight, and to be no less grateful than those who had conferred the dignity upon him, he ordered that the priors, who had hitherto been called priors of the trades, should also have a name to which they had no kind of claim, and therefore called them priors of liberty.

    The History of Florence

  • According to Bayes' Rule, a rational person starts with some beliefs about probabilities his "priors" and changes them in a particular way as new information arrives, in order to reach...

    EconLog: Behavioral Economics and Rationality Archives

  • I'm curious about how you're thinking about alternative constructions of a narrative based on different "priors".

    Neurath on sociology

  • According to Bayes' Rule, a rational person starts with some beliefs about probabilities (his "priors") and changes them in a particular way as new information arrives, in order to reach new beliefs (his "posteriors").

    The Common Sense of Bayesianism, Bryan Caplan | EconLog | Library of Economics and Liberty

  • I don't care if you're a habitual voter, have Republican "priors" in your history, are AWOL, or have never bothered to register.

    Jewell Rae Jeffers: Year of the Rat: Nutritional Guidance for the 2008 Presidential Election: Democracy Frittata

  • I am much disposed to believe, that by “slow bellies” St. Paul understood voluptuous men and gross feeders — a kind of priors, canons, and abbots-commendatory — rich prelates, who lay in bed all the morning to recover from the excesses of the evening, as Marot observes in his eighty-sixth epigram in regard to a fat prior, who lay in bed and fondled his grandson while his partridges were preparing;

    A Philosophical Dictionary

  • According to Bayes' Rule, a rational person starts with some beliefs about probabilities his "priors" and changes them in a particular way as new information arrives, in order to reach...

    EconLog: July 2005 Archives

  • The abbot of Cluny appointed their "priors," or heads, and required every monk to pass several years of his monastic life at Cluny itself.

    Early European History

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