property-owning love

property-owning

Definitions

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • adjective owning land or securities as a principal source of revenue

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • At first I had difficulty working out the logic of the setting: why, in particular, should Patrick Stewart's multi-millionaire property-owning, semi-assimilated Shylock feel an "ancient grudge" towards the local Christians?

    The Merchant of Venice - review

  • And a strike, under certain provocation, may extend as far as did the general strike in Belgium a few years since, when practically the entire wage-earning population stopped work in order to force political concessions from the property-owning classes.

    THE CLASS STRUGGLE

  • Britain may once have been close to a property-owning democracy, but it is becoming a property-owning oligarchy.

    Greed is still good for Britain's elite | Nick Cohen

  • When they did, their living standards would rise each year, allowing them to buy a home, have children and find a secure place for themselves in a property-owning democracy.

    Greed is still good for Britain's elite | Nick Cohen

  • When they did, their living standards would rise each year, allowing them to buy a home, have children and find a secure place for themselves in a property-owning democracy.

    Greed is still good for Britain's elite | Nick Cohen

  • The social hierarchy, when our Constitution was written, went roughly like this: property-owning free white males; property-less free white males; indentured white males; white females; free non-white males; free non-white females; slaves (who were only counted as three-fifths of a person, for Census reasons); and then Native Americans (who weren't even counted at all).

    Chris Weigant: Reading the Constitution

  • The social hierarchy, when our Constitution was written, went roughly like this: property-owning free white males; property-less free white males; indentured white males; white females; free non-white males; free non-white females; slaves (who were only counted as three-fifths of a person, for Census reasons); and then Native Americans (who weren't even counted at all).

    Chris Weigant: Reading the Constitution

  • This shows how many people have won or lost, more dramatically than was possible before 1979, under the new rules of the "property-owning democracy".

    So You Think You Know About Britain? by Danny Dorling - review

  • The social hierarchy, when our Constitution was written, went roughly like this: property-owning free white males; property-less free white males; indentured white males; white females; free non-white males; free non-white females; slaves (who were only counted as three-fifths of a person, for Census reasons); and then Native Americans (who weren't even counted at all).

    Chris Weigant: Reading the Constitution

  • Britain may once have been close to a property-owning democracy, but it is becoming a property-owning oligarchy.

    Greed is still good for Britain's elite | Nick Cohen

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