Definitions

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A genus of Devonian fossil fishes with winglike appendages. The head and most of the body were covered with large bony plates. See placodermi.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A genus of fishes, typical of the family Pterichthyidæ.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • The shark family have their representative as before; a new variety of the pterichthys spreads out its spear-like wings at every alarm, like its predecessor of the lower formation.

    The World's Greatest Books — Volume 15 — Science

  • Of all the organisms of the system one of the most extraordinary is the pterichthys, or winged fish, which the writer had the pleasure of introducing to the acquaintance of geologists.

    The World's Greatest Books — Volume 15 — Science

  • Next to the pterichthys of the Lower Old Red Sandstone I shall place its contemporary the coccosteus of Agassiz -- a fish which in some respects must have resembled it.

    The World's Greatest Books — Volume 15 — Science

  • Though it required skill to determine the place of the pterichthys and coccosteus there could be no mistaking the osteolepis -- it must have been a fish, and a handsome one, too.

    The World's Greatest Books — Volume 15 — Science

  • As the pterichthys and coccosteus are the characteristic ichthyolites of the Lower Old Red formation, so the cephalaspis distinguishes the middle or coronstone division of the system in England.

    The World's Greatest Books — Volume 15 — Science

  • It appears that in the imperfect condition of the vertebral column, and the inferior situation of the mouth in the pterichthys, coccosteus, &c., there is an analogy to the form of the dorsal cord and position of the mouth in the embryo of perfect fishes.

    Vestiges of the Natural History of Creation

  • Some of the fossils of this system, -- the cephalaspis, coccosteus, pterichthys, holoptychius -- are, in form and structure, entirely different from any fishes now existing, only the sturgeon family having any trace of affinity to them in any respect.

    Vestiges of the Natural History of Creation

  • The pterichthys has also strong bony plates over its body, arranged much like those of a tortoise, and has a long tail; but its most remarkable feature, and that which has suggested its name, is a pair of long and narrow wing-like appendages attached to the shoulders, which the creature is supposed to have erected for its defence when attacked by an enemy.

    Vestiges of the Natural History of Creation

  • “It is of the order of ganoids, of the family of the cephalaspidae; and a species of pterichthys.

    Journey to the Interior of the Earth

  • "It is of the order of ganoids, of the family of the cephalaspidae; and a species of pterichthys.

    A Journey to the Interior of the Earth

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.