Definitions

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. See Fund, 3.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • It will be seen by the report from General DeSaussure, herewith transmitted, that not a cent from public funds was lost in any quarter, and that all accounts, from the heads of every department, were fully and correctly rendered up to the ninth of January, eighteen hundred and sixty-two.

    Journal of the Senate of South Carolina: Being the Session of 1862.

  • The rest may come out of the public till, in the form of exemption from taxation of church buildings and lands, a share of the public funds for charities and schools, the control of the police for saloon-keepers and district leaders, the control of police-courts and magistrates, of municipal administrations and boards of education, of legislatures and governors; with

    The Profits of Religion: An Essay in Economic Interpretation

  • "Anything contrary to this would be tantamount to obtaining public funds surreptitiously, which is unlawful."

    Stars and Stripes

  • These publications derive their origin and their title from the Rev. Francis Henry Egerton, eighth and last Earl of Bridgewater who, dying in the year 1829, directed certain trustees named in his will to invest in the public funds the sum of £8,000, which sum with the accruing dividends was to be held at the disposal of the president for the time being, of the Royal Society of London to be paid to the person or persons nominated by him.

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 2: Assizes-Browne

  • The constitution further provides (Sec. 6) that no preference be given by law to any church or religious sect, and forbids the subvention of public funds in aid of any religious denomination or sectarian institution.

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 6: Fathers of the Church-Gregory XI

  • Research to develop the tomato-picking technology was carried out by agricultural professors at the University of California at Davis, using more than $1 million of public funds Schmitz and Seckler, 1970.

    Diffusion of Innovations

  • Another supreme assembly, exercising control over the public administration, is the Court of Accounts; its chief functions are to examine all decrees, from the standpoint of their legality, and thereafter to affix to such decrees its approval, after which they become executive, to control and audit all income and expenditure, to represent the State in all litigation over public funds or other securities of the State or for which the State is liable, and over those salaried officials guilty of peculation or maladministration of public funds.

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 8: Infamy-Lapparent

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