Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun Any one of the Pycnogonida.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun (Zoöl.) One of the Pycnogonida.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun zoology Any sea spider of the class Pycnogonida

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun any of various small spiderlike marine arthropods having small thin bodies and long slender legs

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[From New Latin Pycnogonida, class name, from Pycnogonum, type genus : Greek puknos, thick + Greek gonu, knee; see genu- in Indo-European roots.]

Examples

  • The middle one is essentially a colorized version of the pycnogonid (sea spider) and Pompeii worm artwork I did in black and white for Chris Garcia's fanzine The Drink Tank a month or two ago.

    Not to be flippant...

  • A while back, I reported on a study of pycnogonids, the sea spiders, that appeared to show that that might not be the case: on the basis of neural organization and innervation, that study showed that the way pycnogonid chelifores a pair of large, fang-like structures at the front of the head were innervated suggested that they were homologous to great appendages.

    Chelifores, chelicerae, and invertebrate evolution - The Panda's Thumb

  • A while back, I reported on a study of pycnogonids, the sea spiders, that appeared to show that that might not be the case: on the basis of neural organization and innervation, that study showed that the way pycnogonid chelifores a pair of large, fang-like structures at the front of the head were innervated suggested that they were homologous to great appendages.

    The Panda's Thumb: May 2006 Archives

  • Sea Spider (_pycnogonid_) from the Sea east of Cape Chelyuskin, drawn by ditto

    The Voyage of the Vega round Asia and Europe, Volume I and Volume II

  • A deep-sea pycnogonid, or sea spider, holds two detached tentacles of a sea anemone in its mouth amid the mollusk shells and whale bones that have settled on the sea floor.

    ScienceNOW

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