Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun Plural form of rancour.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • "Hitler's attitude towards Russia," he observes, ". . . was suffused by ideology drawn from many sources—racial, economic, historical—and fermented by his own rancours and ambitions into a self-intoxicating potency."

    Those Desperate Hours

  • Put rancours in the vessel of their peace; nor yet primarily for ambition.

    The Three Clerks

  • Other excited persons, doubtless, seeing that we are of a race intemperate of speech, had looked up from their rancours to the dead Lord Mayors upon the wall, superior men whose like we shall not see again, but never, I think, from rancours so seemingly academic.

    Collected Works of W. B. Yeats Volume III Autobiographies

  • Other excited persons, doubtless, seeing that we are of a race intemperate of speech, had looked up from their rancours to the dead Lord Mayors upon the wall, superior men whose like we shall not see again, but never, I think, from rancours so seemingly academic.

    Collected Works of W. B. Yeats Volume III Autobiographies

  • Other excited persons, doubtless, seeing that we are of a race intemperate of speech, had looked up from their rancours to the dead Lord Mayors upon the wall, superior men whose like we shall not see again, but never, I think, from rancours so seemingly academic.

    Collected Works of W. B. Yeats Volume III Autobiographies

  • Other excited persons, doubtless, seeing that we are of a race intemperate of speech, had looked up from their rancours to the dead Lord Mayors upon the wall, superior men whose like we shall not see again, but never, I think, from rancours so seemingly academic.

    Collected Works of W. B. Yeats Volume III Autobiographies

  • He found something in them that roused all the most devilish rancours in his nature; and he used to tell them tales till the poor ladies did not know where to tuck their heads.

    The Life of Sir Richard Burton

  • The social world being the realm of nullity, there exist between the merits of women in society only insignificant degrees, which are at best capable of rousing to madness the rancours or the imagination of M. de Charlus.

    The Captive

  • Unhappily, just because the former are only half-minds they require action to complete themselves and as through this they exercise more influence than superior minds, they impose themselves on the mass and create a constituency not merely of unmerited reputations and unjustifiable rancours but also of civil and exterior warfare from which a little self-criticism might have saved them.

    Time Regained

  • Their full slow eyes belied the words, the gestures eager and unoffending, but knew the rancours massed about them and knew their zeal was vain.

    Ulysses

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