Definitions

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  • verb Present participle of rarify.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Though I think this sort of distasteful rarifying goes on in most fields.

    Please let me know what you think about art criticism

  • Animals through the Lungs, which increase the heat of it, or is the Pulse caused by rarifying the Blood or any Part of it, into Vapour, like the Experiment made with a with

    John Adams diary 40, 29 April - 22 May 1783

  • This makes a draught upward, and the fire rarifying the air below, makes another draught underneath, which causes the fire to burn very fiercely, and melt any ore in the crucibles that are set upon the fire.

    The Westover Manuscripts: Containing the History of the Dividing Line Betwixt Virginia and North Carolina; A Journey to the Land of Eden, A. D. 1733; and A Progress to the Mines. Written from 1728 to 1736, and Now First Published

  • And what need we ought else to explain the nutrition and the production of divers humours which are in the body, but to say, that the force wherewith the bloud in rarifying it self, passeth from the heart towards the extremities or the arteries, causeth some of its parts to stay amongst those of the members where they are, and there take the place of some others, which they drive from thence?

    A Discourse of a Method for the Well Guiding of Reason and the Discovery of Truth in the Sciences

  • College; and some demonstration that the heat and cold of the weather do rarify and condense the very body of glasse, as in a bolt head 'with cold water in it put into hot water, shall first by rarifying the glasse make the water sink, and then when the heat comes to the water makes that rise again, and then put into cold water makes the water by condensing the glass to rise, and then when the cold comes to the water makes it sink, which is very pretty and true, he saw it tried.

    Diary of Samuel Pepys — Complete

  • College; and some demonstration that the heat and cold of the weather do rarify and condense the very body of glasse, as in a bolt head 'with cold water in it put into hot water, shall first by rarifying the glasse make the water sink, and then when the heat comes to the water makes that rise again, and then put into cold water makes the water by condensing the glass to rise, and then when the cold comes to the water makes it sink, which is very pretty and true, he saw it tried.

    Diary of Samuel Pepys — Complete 1664 N.S.

  • Thence walked with Creed to the Coffee-house in Covent Garden, where no company, but he told me many fine experiments at Gresham College; and some demonstration that the heat and cold of the weather do rarify and condense the very body of glasse, as in a bolt head 'with cold water in it put into hot water, shall first by rarifying the glasse make the water sink, and then when the heat comes to the water makes that rise again, and then put into cold water makes the water by condensing the glass to rise, and then when the cold comes to the water makes it sink, which is very pretty and true, he saw it tried.

    Diary of Samuel Pepys — Volume 28: April/May 1664

  • Thence walked with Creed to the Coffee-house in Covent Garden, where no company, but he told me many fine experiments at Gresham College; and some demonstration that the heat and cold of the weather do rarify and condense the very body of glasse, as in a bolt head 'with cold water in it put into hot water, shall first by rarifying the glasse make the water sink, and then when the heat comes to the water makes that rise again, and then put into cold water makes the water by condensing the glass to rise, and then when the cold comes to the water makes it sink, which is very pretty and true, he saw it tried.

    The Diary of Samuel Pepys, Apr/May 1664

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