rationalizable love

Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • adjective Able to be rationalized.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

rationalize +‎ -able.

Examples

  • Bernheim and Pearce argue that when only the structure of the game and the agents 'Bayesian rationality are common knowledge, the game should be considered “solved” if every agent plays a rationalizable strategy.

    Common Knowledge

  • When agents have common knowledge of the game and their Bayesian rationality only, one can predict that they will follow a rationalizable strategy profile.

    Common Knowledge

  • Figure 3.1 if Joanna and Lizzi have common knowledge of all of the payoffs at every strategy combination, and they have common knowledge that both are Bayesian rational, then any of the four pure strategy profiles is rationalizable.

    Common Knowledge

  • In general, the set of a game's rationalizable strategy combinations contains the set of the game's pure strategy Nash equilibria, and this example shows that the containment can be proper.

    Common Knowledge

  • Roughly speaking, a rationalizable strategy is any strategy an agent may choose without violating common knowledge of Bayesian rationality.

    Common Knowledge

  • The rationalizable strategy profiles are the four profiles that remain after deleting all of the strategy combinations in which either Lizzi or Joanna play s2.

    Common Knowledge

  • In these circumstances, any strategy that is a best reply to any vector of mixed strategies available in NE is said to be rationalizable.

    Game Theory

  • Pure coordination games are characterized by non-unique vectors of rationalizable strategies.

    Game Theory

  • (s2, s1), are rationalizable, since it is rational for Lizzi and Joanna to conform with either equilibrium given appropriate distributions.

    Common Knowledge

  • (s1j1, snjn) ˆˆ S is rationalizable if and only if the agents have a Bayes concordant system μ of beliefs and, for each agent k ˆˆ N,

    Common Knowledge

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