Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • Noisy; giddy; trifling.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • adjective Noisy; giddy; unsteady.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • If you brave rattle-headed liberals are doing all the talking, why are there more Republicans that Democrats in the military?

    Axelrod slams Romney

  • Ushered in, or preceded by this rattle-headed talk, Caper and Rocjean stood at last before Ivanhof's celebrated painting -- finished at last!

    The Continental Monthly, Vol. 2, No 3, September, 1862 Devoted to Literature and National Policy.

  • Berthelier took his hand, and with a serious look that sobered the rattle-headed ecclesiastic for a moment, replied, "But let me warn you that this is going to cost you your living and me my head."

    Lippincott's Magazine of Popular Literature and Science, Volume 22. July, 1878.

  • O'Hern was there, to be sure -- heavy-handed, warm-hearted 'Stashie, who took the new little girl to her loyal spinster heart and wept tears of joy over her safe arrival; but' Stashie had proved, as Paul predicted from the first time he saw her, incorrigibly rattle-headed and loose-ended.

    The Squirrel-Cage

  • Ellen was perfection, was middle-aged and settled, never went out in the evenings, kept her kitchen spotlessly clean, trained the rattle-headed second girls who came and went, to be good waitresses and made pastry that moved Paul, usually little preoccupied about his food provided there was plenty of meat, to lyric raptures.

    The Squirrel-Cage

  • I felt as rattle-headed as a rabbit, and was glad when Dinkie and Poppsy captured him by each knee and hung on like catamounts.

    The Prairie Child

  • And we have been proud of our minister, the young, rattle-headed fool!

    Keziah Coffin

  • "Whoa, you rattle-headed fool," he admonished, when the horse snorted and backed a step or two as he approached.

    Sawtooth Ranch

  • "Whoa, you rattle-headed fool," he admonished, when the horse snorted and backed a step or two as he approached.

    The Quirt

  • "You don't mean to say, Lord Deppingham, that you're afraid the heirs will follow the advice of that rattle-headed Saunders," said Chase, with

    The Man from Brodney's

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