reaping-machine love

reaping-machine

Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun A harvesting-machine for grain-crops; a mechanical reaper drawn over a field of standing grain by horses.
  • noun A harvesting-machine for grain-crops; a mechanical reaper drawn over a field of standing grain by horses.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • First of all, he loitered to watch a reaping-machine at work; then he turned into a lane which led up the hill on which was John

    New Grub Street

  • The mauser is not the only reaping-machine the great harvester employs in war time.

    With the Guards' Brigade from Bloemfontein to Koomati Poort and Back

  • He can dispense with an apple-parer and a reaping-machine.

    The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 04, No. 24, October, 1859

  • The reaping-machine was in sight now; it had stopped on the hillside.

    K

  • The dead lanterns swung in the morning air, and from back on the hill came the staccato sounds of a reaping-machine.

    K

  • It cannot be denied, however, that when an electric tram swept past her like a terrace under weigh, closely followed by a cart laden with a clanking and horrific reaping-machine, she showed that she possessed powers of observation.

    All on the Irish Shore Irish Sketches

  • Jimmy says it made the men stop work and look at each other, and the man who was driving the reaping-machine got down to see where it wanted oiling.

    Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 150, March 1, 1916

  • Not long after, a reaping-machine was brought and driven back and forth in the field, and down went all the wheat ears before the great knives.

    Little Saint Elizabeth, and Other Stories

  • "The reaping-machine will come and cut you down, and other strange things will happen."

    Little Saint Elizabeth, and Other Stories

  • There was one wearing a pale pink coat, another in a cream-coloured tight-sleeved gown, another in a petticoat as red as the arms of the reaping-machine; and others, older, in the brown-rough 'wropper' or over-all -- the old-established and most appropriate dress of the field-woman, which the young ones were abandoning.

    Tess of the d'Urbervilles

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