receivability

Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun The quality of being receivable.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun The quality of being receivable; receivableness.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun The quality or state of being receivable.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • And a primatial initiative in challenging or seeking to limit local development on these grounds becomes intelligible as part of the service of the 'mother church' to the local – not ignoring or making light of local pressures and needs, but reminding the local assembly and its chief pastor that it must not lose its recognisability or receivability to other communities – across the globe and throughout history.

    Rome, Constantinople, and Canterbury: Mother Churches?

  • And a primatial initiative in challenging or seeking to limit local development on these grounds becomes intelligible as part of the service of the 'mother church' to the local – not ignoring or making light of local pressures and needs, but reminding the local assembly and its chief pastor that it must not lose its recognisability or receivability to other communities – across the globe and throughout history.

    Rome, Constantinople, and Canterbury: Mother Churches?

  • Therefore I've always been able to maximize my present receivability...

    The Toronto Zoo for my Birthday!!!

  • The judicious legislation of Congress, securing the receivability of these notes for loans and internal duties and making them a legal tender for other debts, has made them an universal currency, and has satisfied, partially at least, and for the time, the long-felt want of an uniform circulating medium, saving thereby to the people immense sums in discounts and exchanges.

    State of the Union Address (1790-2001)

  • The notes thus issued and secured would, in his judgment, form the safest currency which this country has ever enjoyed; while their receivability for all Government dues, except customs, would make them, wherever payable, of equal value, as a currency, in every part of the Union.

    The Continental Monthly, Vol. 4, No. 4, October, 1863 Devoted to Literature and National Policy

  • I learned from the Commissioners of the General Land Office that the question of the receivability of the Scrip had been raised and presented to the late Secretary of the Interior who favored its reception, but before final action, "in the way of patenting," the matter had been laid before the Hon.

    Report of the Superintendent of Public Instruction of North Carolina, for the Year 1869

  • At the earliest possible moment I prepared a statement of the whole case and forwarded it to the Department, and shortly afterwards I was informed by the Commissioner of the General Land Office, by letter dated the 14th of June, that the Secretary of the Interior had made his decision, sustaining the view of the late Secretary, in favor of the receivability of the Land Scrip.

    Report of the Superintendent of Public Instruction of North Carolina, for the Year 1869

  • The judicious legislation of Congress, securing the receivability of these notes for loans and internal duties and making them a legal tender for other debts, has made them an universal currency, and has satisfied, partially at least, and for the time, the long-felt want of an uniform circulating medium, saving thereby to the people immense sums in discounts and exchanges.

    State of the Union Address

  • The judicious legislation of Congress, securing the receivability of these notes for loans and internal duties and making them a legal tender for other debts, has made them an universal currency, and has satisfied, partially at least, and for the time, the long-felt want of an uniform circulating medium, saving thereby to the people immense sums in discounts and exchanges.

    The Writings of Abraham Lincoln — Volume 6: 1862-1863

  • The judicious legislation of Congress, securing the receivability of these notes for loans and internal duties and making them a legal tender for other debts, has made them an universal currency, and has satisfied, partially at least, and for the time, the long-felt want of an uniform circulating medium, saving thereby to the people immense sums in discounts and exchanges.

    Complete Project Gutenberg Abraham Lincoln Writings

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