receiver-general love

receiver-general

Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun In some countries or states, an officer who receives the public revenues in general or in a particular territory: in some of the United States, an additional title of the State treasurer.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • To launch the poet into society, he gave a dinner, and asked all the authorities to meet him — the prefect, the receiver-general, the colonel in command of the garrison, the head of the Naval School, the president of the

    Two Poets

  • If by chance the wife of a receiver-general of finances was to have this chapter read at her toilette by the bel-esprit of the house, she would have a strange contempt for the Romans of the three first centuries, and would not allow a Manlius, Curius, or Fabius to enter her antechamber, should he come on foot, and not have wherewithal to take his part at play.

    A Philosophical Dictionary

  • He was on visiting terms with the authorities — the general in command, the prefect, the receiver-general, and the bishop but in every house he was frigid, polite, and slightly supercilious, like a man out of his proper place awaiting the favors of power.

    Two Poets

  • He was on visiting terms with the authorities — the general in command, the prefect, the receiver-general, and the bishop but in every house he was frigid, polite, and slightly supercilious, like a man out of his proper place awaiting the favors of power.

    Two Poets

  • The only outsider intimate there was the bishop; the prefect was admitted twice or thrice in a year, the receiver-general was never received at all; Mme. de Bargeton would go to concerts and “at homes” at his house, but she never accepted invitations to dinner.

    Two Poets

  • The only outsider intimate there was the bishop; the prefect was admitted twice or thrice in a year, the receiver-general was never received at all; Mme. de Bargeton would go to concerts and “at homes” at his house, but she never accepted invitations to dinner.

    Two Poets

  • And now, she who had declined to open her doors to the receiver-general, welcomed a mere controller of excise!

    Two Poets

  • Michel, the receiver-general, became bankrupt, and Voltaire lost a considerable sum of money in consequence.

    Voltaire

  • To launch the poet into society, he gave a dinner, and asked all the authorities to meet him — the prefect, the receiver-general, the colonel in command of the garrison, the head of the Naval School, the president of the

    Two Poets

  • And now, she who had declined to open her doors to the receiver-general, welcomed a mere controller of excise!

    Two Poets

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