Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • verb Third-person singular simple present indicative form of recognise.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • I hope their label recognises that although the album may not have reach their expectations, that, it is infact a quality album* and a fan fav, and don't just discard it.

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  • Instead, we are going to seek "reform" – something even the BBC recognises is not going to happen.

    A reversal of roles

  • This theology has generally passed into speculative idealism, which under another name recognises the universal empire of law and conceives man's life as an incident in a prodigious natural process, by which his mind and his interests are produced and devoured.

    The Life of Reason

  • She's having a conversation with the cleaner, who after she takes a phone call recognises the person on the other end is also a Serb.

    AustralianIT.com.au | Top Stories

  • You're not limited to check-in to a venue; instead Tooth-Tag recognises your relationship to wi-fi signals and allows you to set up behaviors based on various locations.

    Steve Rosenbaum: SXSW: The Heart of the Realtime Revolution

  • You're not limited to check-in to a venue; instead Tooth-Tag recognises your relationship to wi-fi signals and allows you to set up behaviors based on various locations.

    Steve Rosenbaum: SXSW: The Heart of the Realtime Revolution

  • Field explicitly states that the idea recognises the strength of the social analysis provided by conservative commentators: Put bluntly, and uncomfortably for many on the left, it turns out that the social conservatives were right all along.

    Archive 2009-03-01

  • Field explicitly states that the idea recognises the strength of the social analysis provided by conservative commentators: Put bluntly, and uncomfortably for many on the left, it turns out that the social conservatives were right all along.

    "Societies cannot survive on liberalism alone"

  • There's a subtle but important difference here -- the former phrase recognises the presumption of innocence, and that a person may not, in fact, end up being charged.

    Archive 2008-06-01

  • There's a subtle but important difference here -- the former phrase recognises the presumption of innocence, and that a person may not, in fact, end up being charged.

    Justifying the surveillance society

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