Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun A place where public records are kept and may be consulted.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • The legend of Adapa, the first man, a portion of which was found in the record-office of the Egyptian king Amenophis IV.

    Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 3, Part 1, Slice 1 "Austria, Lower" to "Bacon"

  • Pope Damasus (366-384) built a record-office (archivium) which, besides being the depository of official documents served also as library and chancery.

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 9: Laprade-Mass Liturgy

  • They have made the island a thoroughfare; and London a shop, a law-court, a record-office, and scientific bureau, inviting to strangers; a sanctuary to refugees of every political and religious opinion; and such a city, that almost every active man, in any nation, finds himself, at one time or other, forced to visit it.

    V. English Traits. Ability

  • Baladhu, however, had come to terms with Sapik-zeri and handed the house over to him and had taken the deed (from the record-office) and had given it to Sapik-zeri.

    Babylonians and Assyrians, Life and Customs

  • Vespasian: his library in Rome _in templo Paris_, 15; statement of Aulus Gellius respecting, 19; his record-office, now church of SS.

    The Care of Books

  • A friend of ours, an official in the record-office, kept the affair dragging, until one fine day the fall and death of

    The Companions of Jehu

  • A search was ordered to be made in Mr. Hastings's record-office, called a trunk; and accordingly in the trunk is found a paper worthy of such a place and such a cause.

    The Works of the Right Honourable Edmund Burke, Vol. 12 (of 12)

  • Sometimes, searches into manor-court rolls in the county record-office show that the legend is well founded and that the building of the cottage may have been legitimised by local definitions of 'squatters' rights ', or regularised by the imposition of annual fines which became converted into rents or, eventually, to freehold tenure.

    openDemocracy

  • Sometimes, searches into manor-court rolls in the county record-office show that the legend is well founded and that the building of the cottage may have been legitimised by local definitions of 'squatters' rights ', or regularised by the imposition of annual fines which became converted into rents or, eventually, to freehold tenure.

    openDemocracy

  • You will find it neither a mere list of acts of parliament and record-office, like some; nor yet an antiquarian gallery of costumes and armour, like others; nor a mere war-gazette and report of killed and wounded from time to time; least of all not a "Debrett's Peerage," and catalogue of kings and queens (whose names are given, while their souls are ignored), but a true spiritual history of England -- a picture of the spirits of our old forefathers, who worked, and fought, and sorrowed, and died for us; on whose accumulated labours we now here stand.

    Literary and General Lectures and Essays

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