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Etymologies

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Examples

  • At last, when he beheld the tiny red-bird at the Wishing-Pond, he said,

    A Study of Fairy Tales

  • And a red-bird, dipped in sunrise, cracks from a poplar's top

    Sunrise

  • The flush of sleep still dyed her cheek a rich crimson, which came and went slowly in the light of the young sun, vying in depth now with the silk of her gown, now with the still deeper tones of a mountain red-bird which splattered into rainbow tints the waters of the brook.

    Blazed Trail Stories and Stories of the Wild Life

  • She always took a nap after dinner, lying on a little couch under the two windows in the settin 'room, where the fire-place was, and the old clock, and the mahogany chest that had come from North Carolina, given her by her grandmother, and her red-bird in a cage.

    Mitch Miller

  • She knelt at the banks and splashed the icy water over her face and throat, another red-bird, another wild thing pulsing and palpitating with life.

    Blazed Trail Stories and Stories of the Wild Life

  • Albert Bacon gave me a beautiful red-bird that he shot for me to trim my hat with.

    The war-time journal of a Georgia girl, 1864-1865,

  • The blue-bird with his azure plumes, the thrush clad all in brown, the robin jerking his spasmodic throat, the oriole drifting like a flake of fire, the jolly bobolink and his happy mate, the mocking-bird imitating the notes of all, the red-bird with his one sweet trill, and the busy little wren, are all making the trees in our front yard ring with their glad songs.

    The Story of My Life

  • The wardrobe woman, after much coaxing and bribing, had been induced to lend the girls two of the property costumes, and Nance, with the help of several giggling assistants, was being initiated into the mysteries of the red-bird costume.

    Calvary Alley

  • The blue-bird with his azure plumes, the thrush clad all in brown, the robin jerking his spasmodic throat, the oriole drifting like a flake of fire, the jolly bobolink and his happy mate, the mocking-bird imitating the notes of all, the red-bird with his one sweet trill, and the busy little wren, are all making the trees in our front yard ring with their glad song.

    The Story of My Life

  • They two have strings of pearl thicker than the stem of the grape vine; they are painted with puccoon, and the feathers of the bluebird and the red-bird are upon them.

    Prisoners of Hope A Tale of Colonial Virginia

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