Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • intransitive verb To rush (the quarterback) in a blitz.
  • intransitive verb To carry out a blitz.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun The lowest grade of flour produced in the roller-milling processes. Originally the term was applied to a poor flour made from middlings; now it is applied to the lowest grade produced by the new-process milling.
  • noun A colloquial term for private bank-note currency in the United States about 1837. The name is said to be due to the bills with red edges put out by Jacob Barker in New York.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Some lady EMT with the word "Security" typed in after her name on her red-dog, the term used to describe the pink paper firefighters 'time was recorded on.

    Firestorm

  • The South can not recover from the present stagnation in a quarter-century, by which time it will again have accepted contentedly the original belief that slavery, like one of the lotteries of Georgia, or one of the red-dog banks of Arkansas, is a purely local institution.

    The Continental Monthly, Vol. 1, No. 3, March, 1862

  • Thus, e.g. a child of the Ottawa deer clan on the fifth day after birth was painted with red spots or stripes in imitation of a fawn; the bride and groom in the Kolong red-dog clan of Java were rubbed before marriage with the ashes of a red-dog's bones; a member of the Amaha buffalo clan was on dying wrapped in a buffalo robe, etc.

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 14: Simony-Tournon

  • They filled the Jewish youth's bed with lemon pie; they put out the gas all over the house every night by blowing into the jet in Amory's room, to the bewilderment of Mrs. Twelve and the local plumber; they set up the effects of the plebeian drunks—pictures, books, and furniture—in the bathroom, to the confusion of the pair, who hazily discovered the transposition on their return from a Trenton spree; they were disappointed beyond measure when the plebeian drunks decided to take it as a joke; they played red-dog and twenty-one and jackpot from dinner to dawn, and on the occasion of one man's birthday persuaded him to buy sufficient champagne for a hilarious celebration.

    Book 1, Chapter 2. Spires and Gargoyles.

  • They filled the Jewish youth's bed with lemon pie; they put out the gas all over the house every night by blowing into the jet in Amory's room, to the bewilderment of Mrs. Twelve and the local plumber; they set up the effects of the plebeian drunks -- pictures, books, and furniture -- in the bathroom, to the confusion of the pair, who hazily discovered the transposition on their return from a Trenton spree; they were disappointed beyond measure when the plebeian drunks decided to take it as a joke; they played red-dog and twenty-one and jackpot from dinner to dawn, and on the occasion of one man's birthday persuaded him to buy sufficient champagne for a hilarious celebration.

    This Side of Paradise

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