Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun Refutation; conviction.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun Obs. or R. The act of redarguing; refutation.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun obsolete The act of redarguing; refutation.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Latin redargutio.

Examples

  • Aristotle in precept, but more excellently by Plato in example; not only in the persons of the sophists, but even in Socrates himself, who, professing to affirm nothing, but to infirm that which was affirmed by another, hath exactly expressed all the forms of objection, fallace, and redargution.

    The Advancement of Learning

  • Wherein, nevertheless, my purpose is at this time to note only omissions and deficiences, and not to make any redargution of errors or incomplete prosecutions.

    The Advancement of Learning

  • Let this, therefore, serve for answer to politiques, which in their humorous severity, or in their feigned gravity, have presumed to throw imputations upon learning; which redargution nevertheless (save that we know not whether our labours may extend to other ages) were not needful for the present, in regard of the love and reverence towards learning which the example and countenance of two so learned princes, Queen Elizabeth and your

    The Advancement of Learning

  • First, he showeth himself worthy of redargution or rebuke, secondly, he showeth himself plein of contrition, thirdly, he requireth aid of them that are about him, that he may have remission of his sins, and fourthly, he demandeth of our Lord very absolution.

    The Golden Legend, vol. 7

  • Wherein nevertheless my purpose is at this time to note only omissions and deficiencies, and not to make any redargution of errors or incomplete prosecutions.

    Library of the World's Best Literature, Ancient and Modern — Volume 3

  • For gainsaying; the word in the Greek is anteipein, importing opposition in disputation, with an endeavour to refel or confute what is alleged by another; and the design of it is redargution, called by

    Sermons Preached Upon Several Occasions. Vol. IV.

  • Wherein, nevertheless, my purpose is at this time to note only omissions and deficiences, and not to make any redargution of errors or incomplete prosecutions.

    The Advancement of Learning

  • Aristotle in precept, but more excellently by Plato in example; not only in the persons of the sophists, but even in Socrates himself, who, professing to affirm nothing, but to infirm that which was affirmed by another, hath exactly expressed all the forms of objection, fallace, and redargution.

    The Advancement of Learning

  • And although we have said that the use of this doctrine is for redargution, yet it is manifest the degenerate and corrupt use is for caption and contradiction, which passeth for a great faculty, and no doubt is of very great advantage, though the difference be good which was made between orators and sophisters, that the one is as the greyhound, which hath his advantage in the race, and the other as the hare, which hath her advantage in the turn, so as it is the advantage of the weaker creature.

    The Advancement of Learning

  • And although we have said that the use of this doctrine is for redargution, yet it is manifest the degenerate and corrupt use is for caption and contradiction, which passeth for a great faculty, and no doubt is of very great advantage, though the difference be good which was made between orators and sophisters, that the one is as the greyhound, which hath his advantage in the race, and the other as the hare, which hath her advantage in the turn, so as it is the advantage of the weaker creature.

    The Advancement of Learning

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