redintegration love

Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun Evocation of a particular state of mind resulting from the recurrence of one of the elements that made up the original experience.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun The act or process of redintegrating; recombination, restoration, or reconstruction; restoration to a whole or sound state.
  • noun In chem., the restoration of any mixed body or matter to its former nature and constitution.
  • noun In psychology, the law that those elements which have previously been combined as parts of a single mental state tend to recall or suggest one another—a term adopted by many psychologists to express phenomena of mental association.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun Restoration to a whole or sound state; renewal; renovation.
  • noun (Chem.), Achaic. Restoration of a mixed body or matter to its former nature and state.
  • noun (Psychology) The law that objects which have been previously combined as part of a single mental state tend to recall or suggest one another; -- adopted by many philosophers to explain the phenomena of the association of ideas.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun rare Restoration to a whole or sound state.
  • noun chemistry, obsolete Restoration of a mixture to its former nature and state.
  • noun psychology The reinstatement of a memory upon the presentation of a stimulus element that was a part of the stimulus complex that had aroused the event.

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Middle English redintegracion, from Latin redintegrātiō, redintegrātiōn-, from redintegrātus, past participle of redintegrāre, to make whole again : re-, red-, re- + integer, whole, entire; see integer.]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Latin redintegratus, past participle of redintegro ("to restore, to renew, to repair")

Examples

  • The disintegration of mental forms and their redintegration is the life of the imagination.

    The Sense of Beauty Being the Outlines of Aesthetic Theory

  • It even appears that in the two instances there is rather an antagonism since heightened memory comes near to the ideal law of total redintegration, which is, as we know, a hindrance to invention.

    Essai sur l'imagination créatrice. English

  • The exasperations of the war, and the still more acrimonious exasperations of the period of the political reconstruction and of the organization of northern missions at the South, gendered strifes that still delay the redintegration which is so visibly future of both of these divided denominations.

    A History of American Christianity

  • When I read the story of her redintegration I began to realize something of the wonderful recuperative powers of the human soul.

    Madeleine: An Autobiography

  • IF I dwell at some length on the story of my ancestry and my childhood it is for the purpose of setting forth the elements of weakness and of strength which were inherent in my character and which, combined with the circumstance of my life, brought about my social bankruptcy and made possible my spiritual redintegration.

    Madeleine: An Autobiography

  • When I read the story of her redintegration I began to realize something of the wonderful recuperative powers of the human soul.

    Madeleine An Autobiography

  • IF I dwell at some length on the story of my ancestry and my childhood it is for the purpose of setting forth the elements of weakness and of strength which were inherent in my character and which, combined with the circumstance of my life, brought about my social bankruptcy and made possible my spiritual redintegration.

    Madeleine An Autobiography

  • Emancipation – civilization – redintegration of a great nation,

    Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910

  • St. Paulinus in one of his letters refers to the redintegration of the Cross, i.e. that it never grew smaller in size, no matter how many pieces were detached from it.

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 4: Clandestinity-Diocesan Chancery

  • We may say that there were two dangers which constantly impended over the Roman Empire from its inauguration by Augustus to its redintegration by Diocletian -- a

    The Great Events by Famous Historians, Volume 03

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