Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun Reducibleness; reductibility.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun The property of being reducible.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • In The Logical Structure of the World, Rudolph Carnap attempts to show how a "constructional system" can be built the purpose of which is "to order the objects of all sciences into a system according to their reducibility to one another."

    Philosophy and Literature

  • But in a sense it is the very ubiquity of computational irreducibility that forces there to be only small islands of computational reducibility — which can readily be identified even from quite vague linguistic input.

    Wolfram Blog : 7 years of NKS—and its first killer app

  • Anti-reductionism, not even having an eye for reducibility Turner, 196?

    The Vienna Circle on interdisciplinary science

  • No. To see why it is not, notice that the ascription of limitations and confusions to his logical theory depends almost entirely on taking a special point of view on the nature of logic, namely the viewpoint of Fregean and Russellian logicism, which posits the reducibility of mathematics (or at least arithmetic) to some version of second-order logic.

    Kant's Theory of Judgment

  • But what we have to hope is that a candidate universe that we “catch in our net” will have enough reducibility that we can tell that it really is our universe.

    Wolfram Blog : My Hobby: Hunting for Our Universe

  • In philosophical arguments concerning the reducibility or otherwise of the human mind, Dennett's concept pokes fun at the idea of intelligent design emanating from on high, either originating from God, or providing its own grounds in an absurd, Münchhausen-like bootstrapping manner.

    Supporting Atheists As Anti-Oppression Work

  • Or are you happy to accept the reducibility, and just regard corporate entity status as a convenient sort of short-hand for certain arrangements of interlocking individual rights claims?

    The ALLied invasion of Cato

  • Rather, if Moore is right then the so-called naturalistic fallacy actually embodies a mistaken belief about the reducibility of goodness, perhaps the belief that ˜good™ just means

    Moral Non-Naturalism

  • But the points raised here about diversity of experience and the non-reducibility of one writer's literature to a formula are also valid when we consider ascriptions of social identities.

    Archive 2008-07-01

  • But the points raised here about diversity of experience and the non-reducibility of one writer's literature to a formula are also valid when we consider ascriptions of social identities.

    Literary tradition and social identity

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