Definitions

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. The cat-tail.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. The cattail; any plant of the genus Typha, chiefly T. latifolia and T. angustifolia, the great and the lesser reed-mace, the two species known in England and North America.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. tall marsh plant with cylindrical seed heads that explode when mature shedding large quantities of down; its long flat leaves are used for making mats and chair seats; of North America, Europe, Asia and North Africa
  • n. tall marsh plant with cylindrical seed heads that explode when mature shedding large quantities of down; its long flat leaves are used for making mats and chair seats; of North America, Europe, Asia and North Africa

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • The dominant vegetation, covering two thirds of the reserve and forming a thick barrier around the lake, is the reed community Phragmites australis with lesser and greater reed-mace Typha angustifolia and T. latifolia and Schoenoplectus spp.

    Srebarna Nature Reserve, Bulgaria

  • A few of the streams were full of the fine plant which is popularly known by the name of bull-rush, or bulrush (_Typha latifólia_), but which ought by rights to be called the "cat's-tail" or "reed-mace."

    The Girl's Own Paper, Vol. VIII, No. 355, October 16, 1886

  • The children plunged their burning feet with joy in the damp sand overgrown with tufted horse-tails and the reed-mace with its slender lance.

    Honey-Bee 1911

  • And he nodded in the direction of a patch of the tall, brown, poker-like flowers and leaves of the reed-mace.

    Dick o' the Fens A Tale of the Great East Swamp

  • There were places where it might be possible for a tunnel to run down into the water, shady spots where willows and alders overhung the lake; places where birch and hazels grew close up to the patches of rushes and reed-mace, with its tall broken pokers standing high above the waving leaves.

    Crown and Sceptre A West Country Story

  • Ere Owen and Robert had helped the other two ladies to land in a more rational manner, she was shaking her mischievous head at a window, and thrusting in her sceptral reed-mace.

    Hopes and Fears or, scenes from the life of a spinster

  • Typha latifolia* (common cat-tail or reed-mace), extremely abundant between Bangor and Portland.

    The Maine Woods

  • Occasionally the gigantic reed-mace (_Typha elephantina_) is seen, and tufts of tall reeds (_Arundo_).]

    Himalayan Journals — Complete

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