Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • To gild anew.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • transitive verb To gild anew.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • verb transitive To gild again.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

re- +‎ gild

Examples

  • Sue Denson recalled how much energy he put into restoring the frame of the huge Chippendale mirror and Alan Higgin remembered Roald teaching him how to regild it.

    Storyteller

  • They asked us two crowns of six francs each to regild them, but it is much better to give the money to the poor; and they are very ugly besides, and I should much prefer a round table of mahogany.

    Les Miserables

  • He mused for a moment and added, shaking his old head: “He! ho! by Our Lady, I am not Philippe Brille, and I will not regild the great vassals of the crown.

    V. The Closet Where Monsieur Louis of France Recites His Orisons. Book X

  • I liked your Mr. Clyffurde and if it were not so late in the day and there was still time to give my opinion, I should suggest that Mr. Clyffurde's money could quite well regild our family 'scutcheon.

    The Bronze Eagle A Story of the Hundred Days

  • "And you, child, are marrying a kinsman of that abominable Duc de Raguse in order to regild our family escutcheon."

    The Bronze Eagle A Story of the Hundred Days

  • There seemed to my perverted sense a certain poetic justice about the fact that money, gained honestly but prosaically, in groceries or gas, should go to regild an ancient blazon or prop up the crumbling walls of some stately palace abroad.

    Worldly Ways and Byways

  • The Jewish families which regild the old nobility with their money become gradually absorbed.

    Der Judenstaat. English

  • They asked us two crowns of six francs each to regild them, but it is much better to give the money to the poor; and they are very ugly besides, and I should much prefer a round table of mahogany.

    Les Miserables, Volume I, Fantine

  • And then as regarded fashion, it might perhaps not be beyond the power of a Mrs. Proudie to regild the word with a newly burnished gilding.

    Framley Parsonage

  • They asked us two crowns of six francs each to regild them, but it is much better to give the money to the poor; and they are very ugly besides, and I should much prefer a round table of mahogany.

    Les Misérables

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