Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. The act of removing; removal.
  • n. The state of being remote.
  • n. Obsolete Departure.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. remoteness
  • n. departure, the act of leaving

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. The act of removing; removal.
  • n. The state of being remote; remoteness.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. The act of removing; removal.
  • n. The state of being remote; remoteness.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. the act of removing

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

Middle English remocion, from Latin remōtiō, remōtiōn-, from remōtus, past participle of removēre, to remove; see remove.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Old French, or from Latin removere.

Examples

  • Greed is remotion of inhabitants by military force, as centuries ago argentines were removed.

    The Falkland Islands 25 Years Later

  • We know God from creatures as their principle, and also by way of excellence and remotion.

    Archive 2005-08-01

  • In natural theology, we can only explain "by way of negation and remotion" what that means.

    The Robinson-Blosser Debate on Divine Simplicity

  • Empedocles, that a moderate cooling of the blood causeth sleep, but a total remotion of heat from blood causeth death.

    Essays and Miscellanies

  • His doctrine of God holds the Plotinian notions of divine unity and remotion in tension with the Biblical emphasis upon the sovereign God's active involvement in creation and redemption.

    Confessions and Enchiridion, newly translated and edited by Albert C. Outler

  • Regained_ -- "stimulating the sense of its utter solitude and remotion from men and cities"; and, last and best, the comparison of Satan, in the same poem, to an old man gathering sticks upon a winter's day.

    Milton

  • The whitish gleam was the mask conferred by the enormity of their remotion.

    Narrative and Miscellaneous Papers

  • The shadowy exhibition of a regal banquet in the desert, draws out and stimulates the sense of its utter solitude and remotion from men or cities.

    Theological Essays and Other Papers — Volume 2

  • Holiness of persons is twofold; either relative and external, which signifies the peculiar relation of a person to God; such were called iereis, priests, or holy men: or else habitual and inherent; such is the holiness of good men, and it is a separation from moral imperfection, that is, from sin and impurity: and this is called osio'tes and the primary notion of it is negative, and signifies the absence and remotion of sin.

    The Works of Dr. John Tillotson, Late Archbishop of Canterbury. Vol. 06.

  • Hartleian process has been rejected by his followers, and the consciousness considered as a result, as a tune, the common product of the breeze and the harp though this again is the mere remotion of one absurdity to make way for another, equally preposterous.

    Biographia Literaria

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