Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • transitive v. To emit (absorbed radiation) anew: "Different organic materials in the soil reradiate the sun's heat at different rates” ( Lori Oliwenstein).

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • v. To absorb some amount of radiative energy, and then later emit that energy in the form of radiative energy. The term is most often used in discussion of absorption of light or infrared radiation.

Etymologies

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Examples

  • Ali, who trains blacks in a new science he developed that teaches them how they can use their 'distinctive' eumelanin to reradiate ultraviolet light and focus it on whites for the purpose of giving whites skin cancers carcinomas, sarcomas and melanomas, visited Cincinnati to champion Webster and to institute a branch of his science here in the city.

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  • Individually, they are excited by incident photons and reradiate in a given spectrum.

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  • The entire theory that "greenhouse gases" in the atmosphere can reradiate energy back to the Earth and thus cause more heating, has been proven to violate the laws of thermodynamics, and thus to be completely devoid of physical reality.

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  • In turn, all these surfaces within the space reradiate to one another until equilibrium is attained.

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  • Some gases absord radiation of certain wavelengths and reradiate it.

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  • I still don't -- the fact is, everything we know about carbon dioxide indicates that it has a greenhouse effect, because it is more efficient at passing sunlight through to the earth, than at allowing that energy to reradiate back into space as heat.

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  • The beam excites the atom as it falls between the mirrors, causing it to reradiate the light in all directions.

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  • "... - the fact is, everything we know about carbon dioxide indicates that it has a greenhouse effect, because it is more efficient at passing sunlight through to the earth, than at allowing that energy to reradiate back into space as heat ...."

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