Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • Pertaining to or characterized by restitution, in any sense.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • adjective Of or pertaining to restitution; tending to restore to a previous state.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • I take the view that the law of the state, enforced either through penal sanctions or restitutive damages, should focus on controlling a general term intended to include the possibility of banning actions which are anti-social.

    "It Should Be Banned!" - Thoughts On Banning Things

  • In short, the struggle is not for simple "inclusion", or for the mere de-racialisation of access, or for a "re-capitalising" promotion into the "first economy", or for the restitutive provision of slices of action - it is about transforming the power relations embedded in CST.

    Two steps forward, two steps back

  • In short, the struggle is not for simple "inclusion", or for the mere de-racialisation of access, or for a "re-capitalising" promotion into the "first economy", or for the restitutive provision of slices of action - it is about transforming the power relations embedded in CST.

    CONTENTS

  • Only massive, concerted efforts of the government to survey the land assigned under the Panchami Land scheme and identify the land alienated to non-Dalits in violation of the conditions can lead to restitutive justice on the ground.

    The Hindu - Front Page

  • These findings expand the mechanistic role for chemokines and HBD2 in mucosal inflammation to include immunocyte trafficking and killing of microbes with the concomitant activation of restitutive

    Journal of Biological Chemistry current issue

  • The Malleus was written in 1486; the emergence of the witch hunts depended on certain signal features of modern jurisprudence especially the replacement of punitive criminal law, where medieval law had been primarily restitutive and most rights violations handled as civil cases rather than as crimes against the State, and the period of the deadliest witch hunts is generally dated to ca. 1560–1760, contemporary with the English Renaissance, the later Reformation, the Scientific Revolution, the colonization of the Americas, the peak of the European Enlightenment, and the flowering of vernacular male European culture.

    Women and the Invisible Fist

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