Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. Biology A band or bandlike structure that holds an organ or a part in place.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A connecting band.
  • n. One of the annular ligaments which hold the tendons close to the bones at the larger joints, as at the wrist and ankle.
  • n. One of the retractor muscles of the proboscis of certain worms.
  • n. A loop on the underside of the forewing of some moths.
  • n. A small gland or process to which bodies are attached; as, the glandular retinacula to which the pollinia of orchids are attached, or the hooks which support the seeds in many acanthaceous plants.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n.
  • n. A connecting band; a frænum.
  • n. One of the annular ligaments which hold the tendons close to the bones at the larger joints, as at the wrist and ankle.
  • n. One of the retractor muscles of the proboscis of certain worms.
  • n. A small gland or process to which bodies are attached.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. In botany: A viscid gland belonging to the stigma of orchids and asclepiads. and holding the pollen-masses fast.
  • n. The persistent and indurated hook-like funiculus of the seeds in most Acanthaceæ. A. Gray.
  • n. In anatomy, a restraining band; a bridle or frenum: applied to such fibrous structures as those which bind down the tendons of muscles; also to the bridle of the ileocæcal valve.
  • n. In entomology, specifically, a small scale or plate which in some insects checks undue protrusion of the sting.
  • n. In surgery, an instrument formerly used in operations for hernia, etc.
  • n. In entomology: An arrangement of hooks, or of hooks and bristles, whereby the fore and hind wings of insects are interlocked when in flight.

Etymologies

Latin retināculum, band, tether : retinēre, to restrain; see retain + -culum, suff. denoting instruments.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
Latin (Wiktionary)

Examples

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