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Examples

  • [5] Dol rgyal zhib 'jug tshogs chung, (Dol rgyal lam shugs ldan byung rim la dpyad pa) (Dharamsala, 1998), 25-35.

    Appendix

  • Traditionally, the Ge-luk tradition has been protected by the Dharma-king (dam can chos rgyal), the supra-mundane deity bound to an oath given to Dzong-ka-ba, the founder of the tradition.

    The Shuk-den affair: Origins of a Controversy (Part I)

  • The assertion that this Tibetan spirit (bod de'i rgyal po) is Drak-ba Gyel-tsen, the reincarnation of the Upper Chamber, is just an expression of prejudice.

    The Shuk-den affair: Origins of a Controversy (Part I)

  • When asked to explain the origin of the practice of Dor-je Shuk-den, his followers point to a rather obscure and bloody episode of Tibetan history, the premature death of Trul-ku Drak-ba Gyel-tsen (sprul sku grags pa rgyal mtshan, 1618-1655).

    The Shuk-den affair: Origins of a Controversy (Part I)

  • Drak-ba Gyel-tsen (sprul sku grags rgyan skye bar grags pa'i khang zhi bde skyid rgyal po) (Rehu mig,) 70.

    The Shugden Affair: Origins of a Controversy (Part I)

  • In recent years the community of Tibetan Buddhists has been agitated by an intense dispute concerning the practice of a controversial deity, Gyel-chen Dor-je Shuk-den (rgyal chen rdo rje shugs ldan).

    The Shuk-den affair: Origins of a Controversy (Part I)

  • Shuk-den as a deity does not appear to be very different from other worldly protectors who are all perceived to inspire awe and fear and hence have the potential for being put to troubling uses, though the particular cultural scenario associated with Shuk-den, i.e., being a spirit of a dead religious person (rgyal po), may mark him as a particularly fierce deity.

    The Shuk-den Affair: Origins of a Controversy (Part II)

  • It also clear that Shuk-den as a deity does not appear to be very different from other worldly protectors who are all perceived to inspire awe and fear and hence have the potential for being put to troubling uses, though the particular cultural scenario associated with Shuk-den, i.e., being a spirit of a dead religious person (rgyal po), may mark him as a particularly fierce deity.

    The Shugden Affair: Origins of a Controversy (Part II)

  • "You are the eyes of the world" is a translation of the noted Buddhist practitioner Longchenpa's practical guide to the trantra (The Jewel Ship: A Guide to the Meaning of Pure and Total Presence, the Creative Enenrgy of the Universe, byang chub kyi sems kun byed rgyal po'i don khrid din chen sgru bo) It was translated by Kennard Lipman and Merrill Peterson and published by Lotsawa of Novato, Ca.

    The Annotated "Eyes of the World"

  • His full style was ḥPhagspa bLo-gros-rgyal-mthsan.] [Footnote 936: By abhiśekha or sprinkling with water.] [Footnote 937: Vaśitâ is a magical formula which compels the obedience of spirits or natural forces.

    Hinduism and Buddhism, An Historical Sketch, Vol. 3

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