Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun A bolt having a ring fitted through its eye.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun In ships, a metallic bolt with an eye to which is fitted a ring.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun An eyebolt having a ring through the eye.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun An eyebolt that has a ring through the eye.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

ring +‎ bolt

Examples

  • There was a length of sunbleached rope tied to a ringbolt set in one corner of the cement.

    Blaze

  • Koyanagi had struck his hip on a ringbolt in the rush to abandon ship.

    Sea of Thunder

  • Koyanagi had struck his hip on a ringbolt in the rush to abandon ship.

    Sea of Thunder

  • Jordas put up at a quiet old inn, and had Saracen chained strongly to a ringbolt in the stable; then he set off afoot to see

    Mary Anerley

  • Then they lifted the shaft and fastened it to the ringbolt in the footplate.

    Warlock

  • Still more significantly, its angle, here where it was bent through a huge ringbolt, slanted noticeably off the vertical.

    Exodus From The Long Sun

  • The oars were at once tossed, while the bowman gripped a projecting ringbolt in the side of the hulk with his boathook to hold on by; and the other cadets and myself, jumping out on to the ladderway, made our way nimbly enough up to the deck of the mastless _Blake_, passing over her by a gangway to the _Candahar_ that lay on her further side.

    Crown and Anchor Under the Pen'ant

  • It took three of them to haul the creature aboard, where it was fastened to a ringbolt on deck for the first stage of its journey to the Zoo.

    Dick in the Everglades

  • For my part, as soon as I had let the foresail run, I threw myself flat on deck, with my feet against the narrow gunwale of the bow, and with my hands grasping a ringbolt near the foot of the foremast.

    Elson Grammar School Literature v4

  • Before you could say "Jack Robinson," the whip was down and the purchase in the top; then, the standing part of the tackle was made fast to the yard pendant and the spar swayed up, as the men walked away with the fall, which was rove through a snatchblock hooked on to a ringbolt fixed in the deck and led to the capstan.

    Crown and Anchor Under the Pen'ant

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