Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun Ecclesiastical Solemn prayer or supplication, especially as chanted during the rites of a Rogation Day.
  • noun The formal proposal of a law in ancient Rome by a tribune or consul to the people for acceptance or rejection.
  • noun A law proposed in this manner.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun In Rom. jurisprudence, the demand by the consuls or tribunes of a law to be passed by the people.
  • noun Litany; supplication: especially as said in procession.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun (Rom. Antiq.) The demand, by the consuls or tribunes, of a law to be passed by the people; a proposed law or decree.
  • noun (Eccl.) Litany; supplication.
  • noun (Eccl.) the three days which immediately precede Ascension Day; -- so called as being days on which the people, walking in procession, sang litanies of special supplication.
  • noun (Bot.) a European species of milkwort (Polygala vulgaris); -- so called from its former use for garlands in Rogation week.
  • noun the second week before Whitsunday, in which the Rogation days occur.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun A deeply serious and somber prayer or entreaty.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun a solemn supplication ceremony prescribed by the church

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Middle English rogacioun, from Latin rogātiō, rogātiōn-, from rogātus, past participle of rogāre, to ask; see reg- in Indo-European roots.]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Latin rogātiō, from rogō ("request")

Examples

  • Laws, or rather, Rogations, for a law before it was finally passed was known as a rogation, and these were long discussed before they were agreed to.

    The Story of Rome from the Earliest Times to the End of the Republic

  • Speaking of the Fraternity, they also have put up some images of their rogation day observances; here is a sample:

    Children's Feast of St. Jean Baptist de la Salle and Rogation Day Procession

  • Initially, however, the king did not wait for a rogation day to collect the necessary revenues for the young prince's household.

    From Heads of Household to Heads of State: The Preaccession Households of Mary and Elizabeth Tudor, 1516-1558

  • At that time young lawyers did not, as they do now, keep the fasts of the Church, the four rogation seasons, and the vigils of festivals; so Granville was not at first aware of the regular recurrence of these Lenten meals, which his wife took care should be made dainty by the addition of teal, moor-hen, and fish-pies, that their amphibious meat or high seasoning might cheat his palate.

    A Second Home

  • At that time young lawyers did not, as they do now, keep the fasts of the Church, the four rogation seasons, and the vigils of festivals; so Granville was not at first aware of the regular recurrence of these Lenten meals, which his wife took care should be made dainty by the addition of teal, moor-hen, and fish-pies, that their amphibious meat or high seasoning might cheat his palate.

    A Second Home

  • He still insists that metaphysics is, above all else, a form of “questioning and interro - gation,” but by now his own survey forces him to go on to say that “the particular form given to the inter - rogation is, in the last resort, unimportant.”

    METAPHYSICAL IMAGINATION

  • All three, and particu - larly Bruno, extend Ficino's anthropocentrism into cosmic dimensions, as they unfold a universe to be explored and understood through the unfettered inter - rogation of nature rather than by a perusal of tradi - tional authors — an ideal consecrated by Bruno's martyrdom.

    PLATONISM IN THE RENAISSANCE

  • Gaul about the year 452, S. Mamertus bishop of Vienne appointed solemn litanies to be recited on the three _rogation_ days.

    The Ceremonies of the Holy-Week at Rome

  • Special times are appointed for them: the hours for the various parts of the daily Office, days of rogation or of vigil, seasons of Advent and

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 12: Philip II-Reuss

  • This general chapter assembled once a year, at Sempringham, on the rogation days, and was attended by the prior, cellarer, and prioress of each house.

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 6: Fathers of the Church-Gregory XI

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