Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A wall-plate which receives the lower ends of the rafters of a roof.
  • n. In steam-boilers, a crown-sheet; the plate forming the top of the fire-box in a locomotive boiler or other internally fired boiler.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Either a single-slope roof with a peripheral overhang all around the walls, where there must be a good anchoring of the roof at the top of the walls (using a roof-plate or a ring-beam), or having an overhang only on the lower edge and attaching the roof to the rest of the perimeter of the walls which form a parapet (e.g. fired bricks or concrete).

    Chapter 6

  • The sides of these buildings, and the ends above the line of roof-plate, were of frame construction, made of heavy oak timber, rudely squared, put together with treenails and boarded with oak, usually at an angle of forty-five degrees, thus making of every board a separate brace.

    Lippincott's Magazine, November 1885

  • The contained cavity is more or less triangular in outline, the base being formed by the roof-plate, which is thin and greatly expanded transversely.

    IX. Neurology. 2. Development of the Nervous System

  • The roof-plate of the telencephalon remains thin, and is continuous in front with the lamina terminalis and behind with the roof-plate of the diencephalon.

    IX. Neurology. 2. Development of the Nervous System

  • The roof-plate of the primitive fore-brain remains thin and of an epithelial character; it is invaginated into the lateral ventricle along the medial wall of the hemisphere.

    IX. Neurology. 2. Development of the Nervous System

  • The rudiment of the cerebellum at first projects in a dorsal direction; but, by the backward growth of the cerebrum, it is folded downward and somewhat flattened, and the thin roof-plate of the fourth ventricle, originally continuous with the posterior border of the cerebellum, is projected inward toward the cavity of the ventricle.

    IX. Neurology. 2. Development of the Nervous System

  • The roof-plate of the diencephalon, in front of the pineal body, remains thin and epithelial in character, and is subsequently invaginated by the choroid plexuses of the third ventricle.

    IX. Neurology. 2. Development of the Nervous System

  • No germinal cells are found in the roof - or floor-plates; the roof-plate retains, in certain regions of the brain, its epithelial character; elsewhere, its cells become spongioblasts.

    IX. Neurology. 2. Development of the Nervous System

  • The pineal body arises as an upward the evagination of roof-plate immediately in front of the midbrian; this evagination becomes solid with the exception of its proximal part, which persists as the recessus pinealis.

    IX. Neurology. 2. Development of the Nervous System

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