Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun The quality or state of having roots, especially of being firmly established, settled, or entrenched.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun The state or condition of being rooted.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun The state or quality of being rooted

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

rooted +‎ -ness

Examples

  • The region where Reagan grew up - defined by the towns where his salesman father, Jack Reagan, could land a job - gave him a sense of what Reagan biographer Lou Cannon calls rootedness, while his mother, Nelle Reagan, saw to it that he viewed his glass as at least half full.

    Yahoo! News: Business - Opinion

  • I disagree with utkal on "rootedness", in the sense that nothing about films like Welcome,

    NAACHGAANA

  • During a lecture in Toronto in 2007, Archbishop Williams had lamented what he called the lack of "rootedness" in the Anglican approach to Scripture and said "we've lost quite a bit of what was once a rather good Anglican practice of reading the Bible in the tradition of interpretation."

    of course, I could be wrong...

  • "I thought it would be a totally appropriate way of starting off the city's celebration, as a way of showing the 'rootedness' of churches within the history of Hattiesburg," she said.

    hattiesburgamerican.com -

  • During a lecture in Toronto in 2007, Archbishop Williams had lamented what he called the lack of "rootedness" in the Anglican approach to Scripture and said "we've lost quite a bit of what was once a rather good Anglican practice of reading the Bible in the tradition of interpretation."

    of course, I could be wrong...

  • My secular, liberal friends clearly derive much of their identity and their rootedness from their political faith.

    Church and State, Arnold Kling | EconLog | Library of Economics and Liberty

  • May's preferred description of love is as "a yearning for ontological rootedness".

    Love in literature

  • What sort of change is possible given the rootedness and pervasiveness of the problem?

    A Conversation with Dan Kindlon and Michael Thompson

  • He calls love a feeling of "ontological rootedness" in another—whether spouse, lover, child, friend or even a thing or idea.

    Isn't Love Divine

  • What sort of change is possible given the rootedness and pervasiveness of the problem?

    A Conversation with Dan Kindlon and Michael Thompson

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