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Etymologies

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Examples

  • Germany, for the Cid in Spain, for the rough-cast verse of the interior nations of Europe, and in Britain for the ballads of

    Uncollected Prose

  • Beyond the road were some cottage roofs and orchards; over these roofs and over the apple-trees behind, high up the slope, and backed by the plantation on the crest, was the house yet occupied by her future husband, the rough-cast front showing whitely through its creepers.

    The Woodlanders

  • This loam, this rough-cast and this stone doth show

    A Midsummer Night’s Dream

  • Some man or other must present Wall: and let him have some plaster, or some loam, or some rough-cast about him, to signify wall; and let him hold his fingers thus, and through that cranny shall Pyramus and Thisby whisper.

    A Midsummer Night’s Dream

  • The other man held a rough-cast banjo by the neck, poking it out before him as a man at a border crossing might present papers in validation of identity.

    Cold Mountain

  • On going into this building, I found one part, that nearest to the high road, converted into a poor kind of public - house, then to let, and having all the squalid appearance of a deserted place, which rendered it difficult to judge what it would look like when neatly kept up, the broken panes replaced in the windows, and the rough-cast (now cracked and discoloured) made white and whole.

    The Life of Charlotte Bronte

  • I flattened myself against the rough-cast plinth and held my breath.

    Two For The Lions

  • The other man held a rough-cast banjo by the neck, poking it out before him as a man at a border crossing might present papers in validation of identity.

    Cold Mountain

  • Five rough-cast round sows of it nestling in each pannier, glittering in the sun.

    The Grass Crown

  • You return to Queen, observing that urban building has already reached into the park lots just west of Yonge, where a neighbourhood of unpretentious planked or rough-cast cottages extends north from Queen: Macaulaytown, subdivided out of the estate granted in 1797 to the army surgeon, Dr. James Macaulay.

    The Life of a New City: Toronto, 1834

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