sacrilegiousness love

sacrilegiousness

Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun The character of being sacrilegious.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun profaneness by virtue of committing sacrilege

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Now we hear little either of its economic aspects or of its sacrilegiousness; it is for us primarily a disgusting abomination, i.e., a matter of taste, of esthetics; and, while unspeakably ugly to the majority, it is proclaimed as beautiful by a small minority.

    Studies in the Psychology of Sex, Volume 2 Sexual Inversion

  • Manitou condemned the sacrilegiousness of the Protestants, whose meeting-houses were used for "socials," "tea-meetings," "strawberry festivals," and entertainments of many kinds; while comic songs were sung at the table where the solemn Love Feast was held at the quarterly meetings.

    The World for Sale, Volume 1.

  • Manitou condemned the sacrilegiousness of the Protestants, whose meeting-houses were used for "socials," "tea-meetings," "strawberry festivals," and entertainments of many kinds; while comic songs were sung at the table where the solemn Love Feast was held at the quarterly meetings.

    The Project Gutenberg Complete Works of Gilbert Parker

  • Manitou condemned the sacrilegiousness of the Protestants, whose meeting-houses were used for "socials," "tea-meetings," "strawberry festivals," and entertainments of many kinds; while comic songs were sung at the table where the solemn Love Feast was held at the quarterly meetings.

    The World for Sale, Complete

  • The philosophy of those days found in these dreams mysterious and preternatural warnings of impending danger; that of ours, however, sees nothing either in the absurd sacrilegiousness of Caesar's thoughts, or his wife's incoherent and inconsistent images of terror -- nothing more than the natural and proper effects, on the one hand, of the insatiable ambition of man, and, on the other, of the conjugal affection and solicitude of woman.

    History of Julius Caesar

  • The philosophy of those days found in these dreams mysterious and preternatural warnings of impending danger; that of ours, however, sees nothing either in the absurd sacrilegiousness of Caesar's thoughts, or his wife's incoherent and inconsistent images of terror ” nothing more than the natural and proper effects, on the one hand, of the insatiable ambition of man, and, on the other, of the conjugal affection and solicitude of woman.

    History of Julius Caesar

  • And this very ecclesiastic probably looks upon the stage as a monument of sacrilegiousness.]

    The Palmy Days of Nance Oldfield

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