Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • adjective anatomy Pertaining to the sacrum and spine.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

sacro- +‎ spinous

Examples

  • It is bounded behind by the sacrum, coccyx, Piriformes, and the sacrospinous and sacrotuberous ligaments; in front and laterally by the pubes and ischia and Obturatores interni; above it communicates with the abdomen proper; below it is closed by the Levatores ani and Coccygei and the urogenital diaphragm.

    XI. Splanchnology. 2e. The Abdomen

  • It is converted into a foramen by the sacrotuberous and sacrospinous ligaments, and transmits the tendon of the Obturator internus, the nerve which supplies that muscle, and the internal pudendal vessels and nerve.

    II. Osteology. 6c. The Bones of the Lower Extremity. 1. The Hip Bone

  • The movement of the anterior segment is slightly limited by its wedge form, but chiefly by the posterior and interosseous sacroiliac ligaments; that of the posterior segment is checked to a slight extent by its wedge form, but the chief limiting factors are the sacrotuberous and sacrospinous ligaments.

    III. Syndesmology. 5i. Articulations of the Pelvis

  • The lesser sciatic foramen is bounded, in front, by the tuberosity of the ischium; above, by the spine of the ischium and sacrospinous ligament; behind, by the sacrotuberous ligament.

    III. Syndesmology. 5i. Articulations of the Pelvis

  • As the fetal head passes the anterior segment the latter is carried upward, enlarging the antero-posterior diameter of the pelvic inlet; when the head reaches the posterior segment this also is pressed upward against the resistance of its wedge, the movement only being possible by the laxity of the joints and the stretching of the sacrotuberous and sacrospinous ligaments.

    III. Syndesmology. 5i. Articulations of the Pelvis

  • —The sacrospinous ligament is thin, and triangular in form; it is attached by its apex to the spine of the ischium, and medially, by its broad base, to the lateral margins of the sacrum and coccyx, in front of the sacrotuberous ligament with which its fibers are intermingled.

    III. Syndesmology. 5i. Articulations of the Pelvis

  • It is a triangular plane of muscular and tendinous fibers, arising by its apex from the spine of the ischium and sacrospinous ligament, and inserted by its base into the margin of the coccyx and into the side of the lowest piece of the sacrum.

    IV. Myology. 6e. The Muscles and Fasciæ of the Pelvis

  • The other notches, one on either side, are formed by the sacrum and coccyx behind, the ischium in front, and the ilium above; they are called the sciatic notches; in the natural state they are converted into foramina by the sacrotuberous and sacrospinous ligaments.

    II. Osteology. 6c. 2. The Pelvis

  • The greater sciatic foramen is bounded, in front and above, by the posterior border of the hip bone; behind, by the sacrotuberous ligament; and below, by the sacrospinous ligament.

    III. Syndesmology. 5i. Articulations of the Pelvis

  • Its anterior surface is in part united to the sacrospinous ligament.

    III. Syndesmology. 5i. Articulations of the Pelvis

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