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Examples

  • Then said the Moor, “Fall to poor fellow!”, and Judar said to him, “O my lord, thou carriest in yonder saddle bags kitchen and kitcheners!”

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  • Whereupon asked she, O my son, the saddle bags are small and moreover they were empty; yet hast thou taken thereout all these dishes.

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  • Then the Fireman get him ready for the journey and hired an ass and threw saddle bags over it and put therein something of provaunt; and, when all was prepared, he awaited the passage of the caravan.

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  • He slept well that night and next morning he took his net and going down to Lake Karun stood there and was about to cast his net, when behold, there came up to him a second Maghribi, riding on a she mule more handsomely accoutred than he of the day before and having with him a pair of saddle bags of which each pocket contained a casket.

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  • “O my mother, no harm shall befall thee, now I am come; so have no concern, for these saddle bags are full of gold and gems, and good aboundeth with me.”

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  • Then the Maghribi laid the saddle bags before him, and, putting in his hand, pulled out dish after dish, till they had before them a tray of forty kinds of meat, when he said to Judar,

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  • So, on the morrow which was the third day, he went down to the lake and stood there, till there came up a third Moor, riding on a mule with saddle bags and still more richly accoutred than the first two, who said to him, Peace be with thee, O

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  • Moor, clad in splendid attire and riding a she mule with a pair of gold embroidered saddle bags on her back and all her trappings also orfrayed.

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  • So Judar followed him into the tent and sat down beside him; and he brought out dishes of meat from the saddle bags and they ate the undurn meal.

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  • So they mounted and returned to Fez-city, where the Moor fetched the saddle bags and brought forth dish after dish of meat, till the tray was full, and said, “O my brother, O Judar, eat!”

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

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