Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun A narrator or chanter of sagas; a Scandinavian minstrel.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Their eyes watered with the keen tang of the peat reek, till, tired with watching the squattering of ducks in farm puddles, they turned as usual upon the family sagaman, and demanded, with that militant assurance of youth which succeeds so often, that he should forthwith and immediately "tell them something."

    Red Cap Tales Stolen from the Treasure Chest of the Wizard of the North

  • Origin of story telling and the story-sagaman and minstrel; the story in language, grammar, song, creative work, dramatization, etc.; the formal and expression of the spiritual; how to tell a tale — psychological principles.

    University of Virginia Record

  • Origin of story telling and the story-sagaman and minstrel; the story in language, grammar, song, creative work, dramatization, etc.; the formal and expression of the spiritual.

    University of Virginia Record

  • Origin of story telling and the story-sagaman and minstrel; the story in language, grammar, song, creative work, dramatization, etc.; the formal and expression of the spiritual.

    The University of Virginia Record

  • Origin of story telling and the story-sagaman and minstrel; the story in language, grammar, song, creative work, dramatization, etc.; the formal and expression of the spiritual.

    The University of Virginia Record

  • Even Homer felt this need, and did not scruple to introduce not only second sight, but gods and goddesses, and to bring their supernatural agency to bear directly on the personages of his chant, and that far more freely than any Norse sagaman.

    Eric Brighteyes

  • The sagaman consults poetical justice very well at first, and prepares us for an unfortunate end by depicting Grettir as, though valiant and in a way not ungenerous, yet not merely an incorrigible scapegrace, but somewhat unamiable and even distinctly ferocious.

    The Flourishing of Romance and the Rise of Allegory (Periods of European Literature, vol. II)

  • Grettir as a man almost everywhere lacks the last touches, while the sagaman has simply thrown away the opportunities afforded him by the insinuated amourettes with Steinvor and the daughters of the friendly spirits, and has made a mere _fabliau_ episode of another thing of the kind.

    The Flourishing of Romance and the Rise of Allegory (Periods of European Literature, vol. II)

  • Love-making gets the novelist's tenderest interest and solicitude, but it receives little attention from the sagaman.

    The Influence of Old Norse Literature on English Literature

  • Jealousy was not the passion to loosen the tongue of the sagaman, and in so far as that is the theme of "King Erik," the play is not Old Norse in origin.

    The Influence of Old Norse Literature on English Literature

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