Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. Any of various thin circular echinoderms of the class Echinoidea, especially Echinarachnius parma, of coastal northern Atlantic and Pacific waters, having a covering of short movable spines.
  • n. The disklike internal skeleton of a sand dollar, having five radially symmetric oblong markings and often a pattern of slotlike holes.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. An echinoderm, of the order Clypeastroida, that has a flat, disk-shaped body with the mouth in a mid-ventral position, and lives in sand, on or near the surface

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. any one of several species of small flat circular sea urchins, which live on sandy bottoms, especially Echinarachnius parma of the American coast.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A flat sea-urchin, as Echinarachnius parma, or Mellita quinquefora; a cake-urchin.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. flattened disklike sea urchins that live on sandy bottoms

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • For his part, Eli attempted the defense that every afflicted and hunted beast attempts, the defense of a sand dollar that settles into the ocean floor or a beaten dog that cowers beneath his forepaws, the worthless twin defenses of shrinkage and anonymity.

    Land of the Blind

Comments

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  • Haha! *picturing flat, circular street urchins*

    January 26, 2008

  • Sionnach,
    Probably sand dollarless

    January 25, 2008

  • There's a Christian legend about the sand dollar and its markings.

    January 25, 2008

  • I wonder what they call flat circular street urchins.

    January 25, 2008

  • any of numerous flat circular sea urchins (order Clypeasteroida) that live chiefly in shallow water on sandy bottoms

    January 25, 2008