Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun Any of numerous beetles of the family Scarabaeidae; a scarabaeid.
  • noun The scarabaeid beetle Scarabaeus sacer, regarded as sacred by the ancient Egyptians.
  • noun A representation of this beetle, such as a ceramic or stone sculpture or a cut gem, used in ancient Egypt as a talisman and a symbol of the soul.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun A beetle.
  • noun In entomology, a coleopterous insect of the family Scarabæidæ, and especially of the genus Scarabæus; a scarabæid or scarabæoid.
  • noun A gem, usually emerald, green feldspar, or obsidian, cut in the form of a beetle and engraved on the under face, common among the ancient Egyptians as an amulet. Also scarabæus.
  • noun A conventionalized beetle, which is a common motive in Egyptian art.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun (Zoöl.) Any one of numerous species of lamellicorn beetles of the genus Scarabæus, or family Scarabæidæ, especially the sacred, or Egyptian, species (Scarabæus sacer, and Scarabæus Egyptiorum).
  • noun (Egyptian Archæology, Jewelry) A stylized representation of a scarab beetle carved in stone or faience, or made in baked clay, usually in a conventionalized form in which the beetle has its legs held closely at its sides, and commonly having an inscription on the flat underside; -- a symbol of resurrection, used by the ancient Egyptians as an ornament or a talisman, and in modern times used in jewelry, usually by engraving the formalized scarab design on cabuchon stones. Also used attributively.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun A type of beetle belonging to the family Scarabaeidae, especially the species Scarabaeus sacer, sacred to the ancient Egyptians.
  • noun A symbol, seal, amulet, or gem fashioned to resemble the sacred beetle.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun scarabaeid beetle considered divine by ancient Egyptians

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[French scarabée, from Latin scarabaeus, from Greek kārabos, spiny lobster, longhorn beetle.]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Middle French scarabée, from Latin scarabaeus ("beetle"), from Ancient Greek κάραβος (karabos, "beetle").

Examples

  • This scarab is invariably engraved with a special formula (chap. xxx.,

    Pharaohs, Fellahs and Explorers

  • Remember how I said my scarab was the most painful yet?

    Here I Go Again

  • Plunged into depression, she sought information about the traditions surrounding King Tut and came to believe that repatriating the scarab was the only way to break the alleged curse.

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  • One level deeper into the scarab is a blend of the Egyptian ankh and the Christian cross.

    The Welkening

  • One level deeper into the scarab is a blend of the Egyptian ankh and the Christian cross.

    The Welkening

  • One level deeper into the scarab is a blend of the Egyptian ankh and the Christian cross.

    The Welkening

  • Enclosing the scarab was a framework of gold which had held, among other elements, a pair of cartouches containing the names of a pharaoh.

    The Curse of the Pharaohs

  • Utset called the scarab beetle and gave him the sack of stars, telling him to pass out first with them.

    Myths and Legends of California and the Old Southwest

  • These words are to be inscribed on a hard green, gold-coated scarab, which is to be inserted through the mouth into the bosom of the deceased.

    The World's Greatest Books — Volume 13 — Religion and Philosophy

  • The scarab, which is a very small one, Leo had insisted upon having set in a massive gold ring, such as is generally used for signets, and it was this very ring that I now picked up.

    She

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