Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Plural form of scaur.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • The two sides of the vale were so near, that at every double of the river the shadows from the western sky fell upon, and totally obscured, the eastern bank; the thickets of copsewood seemed to wave with a portentous agitation of boughs and leaves, and the very crags and scaurs seemed higher and grimmer than they had appeared to the monk while he was travelling in daylight, and in company.

    The Monastery

  • Its name, signifying the Red Valley, seems to have been derived, not only from the purple colour of the heath, with which the upper part of the rising banks was profusely clothed, but also from the dark red colour of the rocks, and of the precipitous earthen banks, which in that country are called scaurs.

    The Monastery

  • Towering crags, and a ridge of jagged scaurs, shut out the sunset, while a thicket of dwarf oak, and the never-absent bramble, aproned the yellow dugs of shale with brown.

    Mary Anerley

  • Among the scaurs and fells and moors the most perturbed spirit was compelled to rest, or try to do so, or at any rate not agitate its body out-of-doors.

    Mary Anerley

  • These are the flushed scaurs and outbreaks of bare rock for which I sighed amidst the smothering greenery of the main island, and the silver gleam of the lakes takes away the blindness from the face of nature.

    Unbeaten Tracks in Japan

  • The Kloofs or ravines are the most remarkable features of this country: in some places the sides rise perpendicularly, like gigantic walls, the breadth varying from one hundred yards to half a mile; in others cliffs and scaurs, sapped at their foundations, encumber the bed, and not unfrequently a broad band of white sand stretches between two fringes of emerald green, delightful to look upon after the bare and ghastly basalt of

    First footsteps in East Africa

  • The mountainside ran in dark scaurs and fantastically carved pinnacles, down to the softly red-gold-ocher-black-dappled plain.

    The Unicorn Trade

  • It was clear from the venerable appearance of the older scaurs, that only at long intervals do the elements produce this formidable effect -- at least many years had passed since the last instance before 1829 had occurred.

    Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, Volume 62, No. 382, October 1847

  • The climber will know that he is at the top of Ben Muich Dhui, when he has to scramble no longer over scaurs or ledges of rock, but walking on

    Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, Volume 62, No. 382, October 1847

  • But among them were new scaurs, still like fresh wounds, with the stones showing the sharpness of late fracture, and no herbage covering the blood-red colour of the sand.

    Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, Volume 62, No. 382, October 1847

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.