Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A variously colored mineral, CaWO4, found in igneous rocks and used as an ore of tungsten.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A mineral composed of calcium tungstate, with the chemical formula CaWO4; an important tungsten ore.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. Calcium tungstate, a mineral of a white or pale yellowish color and of the tetragonal system of crystallization.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. Native calcium tungstate, a mineral of high specific gravity, occurring in tetragonal crystals which often show hemihedral modifications, also massive, of a white, yellowish, or brownish color, and vitreous to adamantine luster.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. a mineral used as an ore of tungsten

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

After Karl Wilhelm Scheele.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Named after the Swedish chemist Karl Wilhelm Scheele (1742-1786).

Examples

  • Hundreds of fossils are locked in glass cases, specimens from all over southern Africa: shells and worms and nautiluses and seed ferns and trilobites, and minerals, too; yellow-green crystals and gleaming clusters of quartz; mosquitoes in drops of amber; scheelite, wulfenite.

    Memory Wall

  • Tungsten is retrieved from the ore minerals scheelite (CaWO4, calcium tungstate) and wolframite ((Fe, Mn) WO4, iron-manganese tungstate).

    Tungsten

  • (As an aside, the mineral scheelite (Ca (WO4, MoO4), calcium tungstate-molybdate) was named after Scheele in honor of his discovery of molybdenum.)

    Molybdenum

  • Another mining sector which employs optical evaluation is scheelite mining, where the mine face is irradiated with an ultra-violet lamp which induces fluorescence of the scheelite.

    Chapter 6

  • This is especially important for those valuable minerals which exhibit a brittle to very brittle tenacity, such as cassiterite, sphalerite and the tungsten minerals scheelite and wolframite.

    Chapter 20

  • Sphalerite, cassiterite (tin ore) and scheelite are only a few examples of this type of brittle mineral ore (see Table).

    Chapter 20

  • Tungsten ores contain tungsten principally in the form of the minerals scheelite (calcium tungstate), ferberite (iron tungstate), hübnerite

    The Economic Aspect of Geology

  • In these occurrences the tungsten mineral is almost invariably scheelite, and is associated with calcite, garnet, pyroxene, and other silicates.

    The Economic Aspect of Geology

  • Both wolfram and scheelite are of considerable importance as a source of tungstic acid for the manufacture of sodium tungstate, which is used as a mordant and for some other purposes, and as a source of metallic tungsten, which is used in steel-making.

    A Text-book of Assaying: For the Use of Those Connected with Mines.

  • Tungsten occurs in nature only in the oxidised state, or as tungstic acid (WO_ {3}), either free, as in wolframine, or combined with oxides of manganese and iron, as in wolfram, or with lime, as in scheelite.

    A Text-book of Assaying: For the Use of Those Connected with Mines.

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