Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • adj. Of or producing knowledge or science.
  • adj. Capable; skillful.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. Of or pertaining to science or to knowledge
  • adj. knowledgeable

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. Pertaining to, or producing, science.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Of or pertaining to science or knowledge; producing or productive of knowledge.
  • Skilful; knowing; characterized by accurate knowledge based on observation and inference.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • I seem to inhale learning, walking amid their foliage; and the odour of their old moth-scented coverings is fragrant as the first bloom of the sciential apples which grew around the happy orchard.

    Hours in a Library, Volume I. (of III.)

  • I seem to inhale learning, walking amid their foliage; and the odor of their old moth-scented coverings is fragrant as the first bloom of those sciential apples which grew amid the happy orchard.

    Pearls of Thought

  • The sciential reason, the objects of which are purely theoretical, remains neutral, as long as its name and semblance are not usurped by the opponents of the doctrine.

    Biographia Literaria

  • Introduce but the least of real as opposed to 'ideal', the least speck of positive existence, even though it were but the mote in a sun beam, into the sciential 'contemplamen' or theorem, and it ceases to be science.

    Literary Remains, Volume 2

  • The question then concerning our faith in the existence of a God, not only as the ground of the universe by his essence, but by his wisdom and holy will as its maker and judge, appeared to stand thus: the sciential reason, the objects of wit are purely theoretical, remains neutral, as long as its name and semblance are not usurped by the opponents of the doctrine; but it 'then' becomes an effective ally by exposing the false show of demonstration, or by evincing the equal demonstrability of the contrary from premises equally logical.

    The Life of Samuel Taylor Coleridge 1838

  • Englishmen and matrons, and thrill societies with their winsome ingenuousness; and who sometimes when unguarded meet an artful serenader, that is a cloaked bandit, and is provoked by their performances, and knows anthropologically the nature behind the devious show; a sciential rascal; as little to be excluded from our modern circles as Eve's own old deuce from Eden's garden whereupon, opportunity inviting, both the fool and the cunning, the pure donkey princess of insular eulogy, and the sham one, are in a perilous pass.

    One of Our Conquerors — Volume 2

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