Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • v. To slate (cover with slates)
  • n. slate

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. Obsolete or dialectal forms of slate, slater.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • For S. Bartholomewes -- I meane not to pulle it downe, but to change it for a Churche more conveniente ... unlesse some strange opinion shulde arise that prayer were more acceptable under leade than under sclate.

    Bell's Cathedrals: The Priory Church of St. Bartholomew-the-Great, Smithfield A Short History of the Foundation and a Description of the Fabric and also of the Church of St. Bartholomew-the-Less

  • But she was greatly delighted to see Boyd, who, if the truth must be told, made his best service like an Irishman and a gentleman -- for, as he said, "Even five-and-thirty years of Galloway had not wiped the sclate of his manners!"

    The Dew of Their Youth

  • -- But want o 'siller it canna be -- he pays ower the shillings as if they were sclate stanes, and that's no the way that folk part with their siller when there's but little on't -- I ken weel eneugh how a customer looks that's near the grund of the purse.

    St. Ronan's Well

  • But want o’ siller it canna be — he pays ower the shillings as if they were sclate stanes, and that’s no the way that folk part with their siller when there’s but little on’t — I ken weel eneugh how a customer looks that’s near the grund of the purse. —

    Saint Ronan's Well

  • Scottish-hearted barons, and with the magistrates of this and other towns, gentles, burgesses, and commons of all ranks, seeing with one eye, hearing with one ear, and upholding the ark with their united strength — And then folk might see men deliver up their silver to the state’s use, as if it had been as muckle sclate stanes.

    The Heart of Mid-Lothian

  • Note M. Sir William Dick of Braid. the Kirk, walking hand in hand with the real noble Scottish-hearted barons, and with the magistrates of this and other towns, gentles, burgesses, and commons of all ranks, seeing with one eye, hearing with one ear, and upholding the ark with their united strength --- And then folk might see men deliver up their silver to the state's use, as if it had been as muckle sclate stanes.

    The Heart of Mid-Lothian

  • * Note M. Sir William Dick of Braid. the Kirk, walking hand in hand with the real noble Scottish-hearted barons, and with the magistrates of this and other towns, gentles, burgesses, and commons of all ranks, seeing with one eye, hearing with one ear, and upholding the ark with their united strength -- And then folk might see men deliver up their silver to the state's use, as if it had been as muckle sclate stanes.

    The Heart of Mid-Lothian, Complete

  • But I dinna ken, Elshie; to be free wi’ you, I dinna like to use siller unless I kend it was decently come by; and maybe it might turn into sclate-stanes, and cheat some poor man.”

    The Black Dwarf

  • I dinna like to use siller unless I kend it was decently come by; and maybe it might turn into sclate-stanes, and cheat some poor man. "

    The Black Dwarf

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