Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Plural form of scullion.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Lord Ridgeley, thiever by cunning process of law of most of my ancient patrimony, and his blackguard son, my Lord Brocton, lustfully hunting the proud, gracious woman beneath, and I said grandiosely to myself, "Rome's destiny is thine too, Oliver Wheatman of the Hanyards, and these betitled scullions are the proud ones you shall war down."

    The Yeoman Adventurer

  • But in a palace the gossip of the kitchen scullions will creep to the throne.

    Chapter 15

  • Oh, I abused them, called them sons of toads, hell's scullions, slime of the pit.

    Chapter 16

  • As the scullions swab down the execution dais, contemplate for a moment the Cabinet that Gordon Brown now heads.

    Archive 2008-01-20

  • To these young scullions Mrs. Bagnet occasionally imparts a wink, or a shake of the head, or a crooked face, as they made mistakes.

    Bleak House

  • In the meantime, Eumolpus, locked out as he was, was being very roughly handled by the cooks and scullions of the establishment; one aimed a spitful of hissing-hot guts at his eyes; another grabbed a two-tined fork in the pantry and put himself on guard.

    Satyricon

  • This information is not a scrap to be thrown to the varlets and scullions by their masters on a whim.

    Cameron Vows to Axe FOI Bill in the Lords

  • At which all the courtiers, lackeys, mistresses, chamberlains, Jesuits, and scullions, clasp their hands and burst into tears.

    The Paris Sketch Book

  • There were hundreds more miscellaneous members of staff, musicians and instrument makers, clock keepers, physicians and chaplains, perfumers and painters as well as the teams of cooks, laundresses, scullions, and cleaners who ultimately kept the royal household running smoothly.

    The Dragon’s Trail

  • I see women marrying indiscriminately with staring burgesses and ferret-faced, white-eyed boys, and men dwell in contentment with noisy scullions, or taking into their lives acidulous vestals.

    Virginibus Puerisque and other papers

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