Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A name of various fishes.
  • n. Any one of the great rays of the family Mantidæ. sometimes reaching a breadth of over 20 feet. They inhabit tropical seas.
  • n. A fish of the family Ceratidæ, inhabiting the open seas.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Beware of the stone fish (SYNANCEIA HORRIDA), the death adder of the sea, called also the sea-devil, because of its malice; the warty ghoul because, perhaps, of its repulsiveness; the lion fish, because of its habit of lurking in secret places; the sea scorpion for its venom; and by the blacks “Mee-hee.”

    The Confessions of a Beachcomber

  • Strange fish and other products of the tropical seas had drifted hither across the Atlantic from the West Indies and America, and in the fishing season the fin whale, blue shark, threshers and others had been caught, also the sun fish, boar fish, and the angler or sea-devil.

    From John O'Groats to Land's End

  • Is it not a miracle that she has transmuted, by a change more amazing than anything Master Ovid hath recorded in his Metamorphoses, a villanous old land-devil and sea-devil like myself into a passionate partisan?

    The Lady of Loyalty House A Novel

  • He also pictures a sea-devil in the same chapter, together with other gruesome examples of the power of imagination.

    Anomalies and Curiosities of Medicine

  • But even then, when weary Crab C raised herself from her fighting depth, and steamed to a dock, the commander of the "Adamant" could scarcely refrain from sending a couple of tons of iron into the beastly sea-devil which had had the impertinence to tow him about against his will.

    The Great War Syndicate

  • Beware of the stone fish (SYNANCEIA HORRIDA), the death adder of the sea, called also the sea-devil, because of its malice; the warty ghoul because, perhaps, of its repulsiveness; the lion fish, because of its habit of lurking in secret places; the sea scorpion for its venom; and by the blacks "Mee-hee."

    Confessions of a Beachcomber

  • They say there is a fish called the sea-toad, surnamed the sea-devil, which stirring and spreading the mud troubles the water round about it so as to hide itself therein as in an ambush, from whence, as soon as it perceives poor little fishes, it darts upon them, kills and devours them: whence perhaps has come the common expression — fishing in troubled waters.

    Treatise on the Love of God

  • But even then, when weary Crab C raised herself from her fighting depth, and steamed to a dock, the commander of the Adamant could scarcely refrain from sending a couple of tons of iron into the beastly sea-devil which had had the impertinence to tow him about against his will.

    The Great War Syndicate

  • But if so be as he is the devil, I say again, I don't care, 'cause I sees exactly how it is -- he be a devil, but he be only a sea-devil and not a shore-devil, and I'll tell you for why.

    Snarley-yow or The Dog Fiend

  • Well, then, one thing is clear; that his power be on the water, and no water will drown that ere imp, so it's no use trying no more in that way, for he be a sea-devil.

    Snarley-yow or The Dog Fiend

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