Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun In hydraulic engineering, a supplementary pair of gates opening outward, sometimes placed at the entrance of a dock or tidal basin in exposed situations, as a safeguard against a heavy sea.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • But we'll have to leave sea-gates in them, for when the tidal waves of 2021 come crashing down from the Appalachians and the Alps, blast their way to the shorelines, and converge on the impact site...

    Making Light: Snowpocalypse Part Next

  • “Hast thou walked about in it, and dost thou know its ways and issues and its sea-gates and land gates?”

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  • It was late afternoon before I grounded my shaky craft on the little beach between the ruined sea-gates and, creeping up the giant steps, made my way to the inner enclosure.

    The Moon Pool

  • From their roofs and balconies, their gardens and vineyards, people raised up to look at us as we came about before the sea-gates of Las Cascadas.

    The Skrayling Tree

  • The canals should have been flooded to serve as a moat, but they did not open the sea-gates.

    The Virgin's Lover

  • The canals should have been flooded to serve as a moat, but they did not open the sea-gates.

    The Virgin's Lover

  • Past the forbidding sea-gates, Nicholas found himself in a courtyard garden much as the one he had glimpsed on his walk to the campiello.

    The Kaisho

  • All these are represented in this lovely harbour within its protecting sea-gates; but none of them are represented intrusively; there is plenty of room, and there are delightful creeks running up into utter woodland solitude, like that one which is the pleasantest way of reaching

    The Cornwall Coast

  • When we liken the place to Fowey or Dartmouth we must grant it the advantages of being closer to the sea; it stands actually at the mouth of its river, instead of retired within protecting sea-gates.

    The Cornwall Coast

  • D. GAMA'S VOYAGE, 1497-1499 A.D. A daring mariner, Vasco da Gama, opened the sea-gates to the Indies.

    Early European History

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.